Feeds

Sell your personal data and receive tax cuts

Bracknell Forest head lobbies for data sharing incentive

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

High performance access to file storage

The leader of Bracknell Forest BC has suggested people who allow their data to be sold to marketing firms could receive council tax cuts.

Paul Bettison told a Conservative party conference fringe meeting that the information from the council's smartcard system could be sold if controls on government databases were loosened.

"If I could use the information on the 45,000 residents who carry cards, I believe I could be the first council in the country to have a zero council tax," Bettison, e-champion of the Local Government Association (LGA), told the Conservative Technology Forum on 2 October.

Such use of the data gathered through the E+ cards, previously known as Edge smartcards, would be voluntary for residents – but for those who did not wish to take part, "it will be £1,400 for a band D", Bettison said.

He added that the data held by the council, such as library books borrowed, indications of income and family, could allow companies to target direct mail with enough accuracy to stop it being annoying, as it would present people with offers that were of genuine interest.

"Targeted junk mail isn't junk mail," he said. "It's welcome if it's relevant to me."

Bettison said the council has received just three expressions of concern about the security of the data collected by the smartcards – but added that people trusted local authorities much more than central government.

"There's nothing more benign than your local council," he said.

He added that he had offered a government minister the use of the E+ system as national identity cards for Bracknell Forest residents, to save money.

"The cost of our card is £4," he said, adding that the high projected cost of the national identity card was due to the interview process.

Following the meeting, Bracknell Forest BC issued a statement saying it had no plans to follow up the idea and that it was careful to abide by the terms of the Data Protection Act.

Vincent Paliczka, director of environmant and leisure, said: "Bracknell Forest Borough Council follows the strict guidelines set out by the Data Protection Act when issuing e+ cards and exactly follows residents' instructions regarding who may have access to the data they provide to us. We have no plans to use private information for commercial benefit.

"For the avoidance of doubt, it would require the explicit permission of significant numbers of individual card holders before we could even consider such a development. If this were to ever materialise, the authority given to us by residents would clearly signify a mutually beneficial arrangement."

This article was originally published at Kablenet.

Kablenet's GC weekly is a free email newsletter covering the latest news and analysis of public sector technology. To register click here.

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Obama allows NSA to exploit 0-days: report
If the spooks say they need it, they get it
Web data BLEEDOUT: Users to feel the pain as Heartbleed bug revealed
Vendors and ISPs have work to do updating firmware - if it's possible to fix this
OpenSSL Heartbleed: Bloody nose for open-source bleeding hearts
Bloke behind the cockup says not enough people are helping crucial crypto project
One year on: diplomatic fail as Chinese APT gangs get back to work
Mandiant says past 12 months shows Beijing won't call off its hackers
Call of Duty 'fragged using OpenSSL's Heartbleed exploit'
So it begins ... or maybe not, says one analyst
Heartbleed exploit, inoculation, both released
File under 'this is going to hurt you more than it hurts me'
Bad PUPPY: Undead Windows XP deposits fresh scamware on lawn
Installing random interwebs shiz will bork your zombie box
Experian subsidiary faces MEGA-PROBE for 'selling consumer data to fraudster'
US attorneys general roll up sleeves, snap on gloves
prev story

Whitepapers

Mainstay ROI - Does application security pay?
In this whitepaper learn how you and your enterprise might benefit from better software security.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.