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HP buys VoodooPC

Woo Woo That Voodoo That You Do So Well

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VoodooPC, the games performance PC specialist, is selling itself to HP, Rahul Sood, the company's CTO, wrote today in his blog.

VoodooPC is staying in Calgary, Alberta and will become part of the gaming division in HP's Personal Systems Group. Rahul Sood becomes CTO for the division and his brother Ravi will be director of strategy for the division. They both report to Phil McKinney, HP's CTO for PSG.

Judging from his blog, Rahul is a man who likes to tell a story, especially one with a cliffhanger ending. He reveals the news towards the end of a long posting titled "Project Vampire" is about to fly, in which he recounts HP's wooing and wowing of his company. Oh, and why he was not interested when Michael Dell came calling.

Most of all, he likes HP's record of innovation and the fact, that he "now has the keys to a $3.5B R&D lab and ... we will be sure to leverage the kick-ass innovations that the PHD's within labs are conjuring up".

Michael Dell, of course, found his gaming PC love child in the form of AlienWare, VoodooPC's greatest rival, which his company bought earlier this year. ®

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