Feeds

Intel to intro first four-core, one-die CPU in H2 07?

'Yorkfield' back on roadmap

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

IDF Intel's first monolithic quad-core processor will ship in H2 2007, a variety of reports from Asia citing Taiwanese motherboard maker sources have claimed. The part, codenamed 'Yorkfield', will have four cores stamped on a single die of silicon, what AMD likes to call a "native quad-core" part.

By that definition, Intel's first quadies - 'Kentsfield' on the desktop and 'Clovertown' in servers - are not 'native' but built from two dual-core dies fitted together in a single chip package. Does it matter? Intel says not, and unsurprisingly, AMD said it does. Since we don't yet have production parts to benchmark, it's all a moot point - and marketing - for now.

Little is known about Yorkfield beyond the number of cores it contains and its frontside bus speed, said to be 1,333MHz. It's also claimed all four cores will share the same pool of L2 cache.

Interestingly, we've heard of Yorkfield before, through the leak of an alleged long-term, 45nm roadmap back in December 2005. Then, Yorkfield was listed as a desktop part targeted for 2008/2009 and sporting 12MB of cache. ®

Read Reg Hardware's complete IDF Fall 06 coverage here

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The hidden costs of self-signed SSL certificates
Exploring the true TCO for self-signed SSL certificates, including a side-by-side comparison of a self-signed architecture versus working with a third-party SSL vendor.