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'We will make more mistakes,' promises HP's CEO

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Like Dunn, Hurd has tried to distance himself from having much direct involvement in the investigation. The only major things he's copped to are having knowledge that an investigation was underway, approving the use of HP funds to pursue the leaker and okaying the content of the spy e-mail meant for a reporter. Hurd denies knowing that the e-mail contained spyware.

What's interesting is that Hurd admitted HP was "not encountering a significant number of leaks" during his tenure as CEO. And yet, it's under Hurd that HP escalated its spy investigation to unprecedented levels. We're still curious about this disconnect. Finding the leaker was a priority for HP, but neither Dunn nor Hurd really paid much attention to how the probe was being conducted and can't remember much about the investigation.

Hurd, for example, only recalls briefly attending a meeting about the probe and can't remember if he heard anything about phone fraud at the meeting. The CEO also ignored a report about the investigation.

"I pick my spots where I dive in for details," Hurd said. "This was not a place that was a priority for me."

How convenient.

To Hurd's credit, he seems to be getting better and better at crisis control. At first, he refused to speak with the press. Then, last week, he read a statement to reporters with a breaking voice. In that statement, Hurd vowed to be held accountable for fixing the scandal but did not take responsibility for the affair.

Today, while again deflecting the real blame onto Baskins, Hunsaker and Dunn, Hurd did at least admit that he failed HP in a massive way. Here's a few of the highlights.

"Not my finest hour, Mr. Chairman."

"I am accountable for everything that is sent to me."

"With the benefit of hindsight, I would not do it again."

"I agree there is a difference between legal and ethical."

"I have seen a lot of stuff in my career. I think I have probably never seen anything like this."

"I am in charge of the company. . . I am responsible for HP. Responsibility goes across the entire company including myself."

"I can understand why you are troubled by the whole thing."

"We are stopping anything that isn't appropriate or ethical in the company."

"Congressman, I will (restore HP's integrity)."

Hurd also guaranteed that "we will make more" mistakes, but the company will show its integrity by handling such gaffes well - apparently. For the first time, Hurd addressed how Bill and Dave might feel about the mess saying, "were they alive today, they would be appalled."

Congressman Jay Inslee (D-WA) chipped in by saying, "I think this hearing is peeling back a layer of an onion that is very disturbing."

You have to hate it when the disturbing onions are involved.

And now onto the final recap.

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