Feeds

'We will make more mistakes,' promises HP's CEO

Crafty plan for more promotions

Security for virtualized datacentres

Today we learned that HP really was as dysfunctional at it seemed to be. Or at least that's the story the company wants the public to believe. Better dumb than calculating.

It has emerged that a couple of people at this company so full of integrity actually thought the fraud was a bad idea. HP's computer security investigators Fred Adler and Vince Nye warned their managers about the suspect investigatory techniques and suggested that HP could be really, really embarrassed if word of the probe tactics leaked to the press.

Of course, Dunn and Hurd deny ever hearing about such nonsense.

"The first time I learned that an employee had expressed concerns was from my lawyer this morning who had read it in the Washington Post," Dunn said.

These types of gaps in HP's story infuriated the subcommittee members. Dunn spearheaded the investigation but didn't manage it. The managers thought some things might be suspect but decided they were probably okay in the end. Hurd got tons of information on the probe, but was too busy to read it - or remember it.

According to today's testimony, HP sought only once to confirm that the "pretexting" methods being used to obtain phone logs were legal. The confirmation came from one of the companies HP hired for the investigation and was penned by a clerk.

It's remarkable to witness the supposed lack of curiosity HP executives had for how the phone records were obtained. Dunn, as reported, claims to have thought it just one of those things to have someone ring up and get your phone records. No big deal. Meanwhile, Hurd, and others, didn't hear about the pretexting until it was too late, and it took Hurd "three weeks" to fully digest that the practice might be "wrong."

The HP crowd keep pretending like pretexting/fraud is a really tough concept to digest.

In addition, they all admit that sending a fake e-mail to a reporter was unethical and that they won't do it again. At the time, however, it seemed like a fine idea to everyone. Have their moral fibers really undergone such an amazing overhaul in the month of September?

For those keeping track, HP has now lost the three board members it trusted most - Dunn, Tom Perkins and George Keyworth. It was that threesome that picked Hurd to be the company's new CEO. In addition, its lead counsel is gone, another top lawyer is gone, its security chief (Hurd said the position is open, so send your resume) is gone and its Chairman is gone.

Top all that off with Dunn's repeated finger pointing at HP veteran and CFO Bob Wayman as the man who advised her on how to handle the mole probe, and you've got a real catastrophe.

And how has Hurd been punished for mishandling the investigation and mishandling the crisis that followed? With a promotion. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
Sysadmin with EBOLA? Gartner's issued advice to debug your biz
Start hoarding cleaning supplies, analyst firm says, and assume your team will scatter
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
Apple SILENCES Bose, YANKS headphones from stores
The, er, Beats go on after noise-cancelling spat
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Three 1TB solid state scorchers up for grabs
Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that we’re giving away worth over £300 apiece.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.