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Intel: 'Nehalem-C' out, 'Westmere' in

Codename musical chairs

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IDF Intel is playing musical codenames again. Having spent the last six months calling the 32nm die-shrink of its 45nm 'Nehalem' microarchitecture, 'Nehalem-C', the technology is now being called 'Westmere', according to Mooly Eden, Intel's Mobility division general manager.

Following revelations that the chip giant's 32nm microarchitecture, 'Gesher', shares a name with a less-than-successful Israeli political party, we wonder if that codename may yet be changed. Westmere appears less controversial - it's a suburb of Aukland, New Zealand, we understand. There are some Westmeres in the US and Canada too.

Intel's Westmere is due to debut in 2010, according to the roadmap put in place by CEO Paul Otellini in April this year and re-iterated by him at IDF this week. ®

Read Reg Hardware's complete IDF Fall 06 coverage here

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