Feeds

ID cards could cost less, minister says

Still horribly intrusive, though

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

A Home Office minister has said the cost of the proposed ID card could be dramatically reduced if the government used its existing databases as a foundation for the scheme.

Liam Byrne, Minister of State, Immigration Citizenship and Nationality at the Home Office, was speaking at a fringe meeting at the Labour Conference in Manchester. He told delegates that his experience as an IT consultant made him wary of taking a "big bang" approach to the project, the BBC reports.

According to his website, Byrne "began his career at Andersen Consulting and worked for NM Rothschilds before starting a venture-backed technology company in 2000".

"There are opportunities which give me optimism to think that actually there is a way of exploiting systems already in place in a way which brings down the costs quite substantially," he said.

The likely cost of the card has been estimated at between £90 and £300 per person. The party has obviously noticed that such a high price tag will not sit well with the traditional Labour supporter.

Byrne did not specify by how much he thought the cost could be reduced.

His approach could avoid relatively few, very large contracts being farmed out to the big IT companies. Instead, there would be more, smaller deals on offer.

Roger Smith, director of human rights group Justice, also addressed the meeting. He warned that the project would fail, like the NHS IT project was failing, and in the process would alienate voters.

Byrne also faced questions about the scope of the project and the implications of a national identity register. One Salford councillor told him he was prepared to go to jail rather than have a card. He told the minister that a national identity card was vulnerable to subversion by a future government. ®

The smart choice: opportunity from uncertainty

More from The Register

next story
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
How long is too long to wait for a security fix?
Synology finally patches OpenSSL bugs in Trevor's NAS
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
Researcher sat on critical IE bugs for THREE YEARS
VUPEN waited for Pwn2Own cash while IE's sandbox leaked
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Prevent sensitive data leakage over insecure channels or stolen mobile devices.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.