Feeds

HP starts printing docs for SEC

Inky upside to murky mess

Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) doesn't want to be left out of the Big Dig into HP's spy operations. The agency has broadened its probe of the company, asking for records tied to the resignation of board member Tom Perkins and documents related to HP's already infamous mole hunt.

It's lucky that HP is in the printing and imaging business because increased ink revenue and scanner sales are the only good things coming from the spy probe. The California Attorney General's office has been acquiring HP docs, as it gets set to file charges against company employees and third parties HP hired to do its dirty work. Documents are also making their way to Washington with HP executives set to testify before a Congressional committee next week.

Incidentally, HP CEO Mark Hurd has offered himself up as a witness for next week's hearings and plans to hold a press conference tomorrow in Palo Alto to discuss the affair. Hurd has suddenly become more vocal after newspapers started to reveal that he likely had deep knowledge of the spy machinations.

HP today also disclosed that it has reached an agreement with Perkins and confessed leaker George Keyworth. The parties have agreed not to sue each other, but both of the former directors have reserved the right to sue third parties involved in the spy operations. HP and the directors have also agreed not to disparage each other in the press. Which is nice.

As a show of good faith, HP will cover legal costs that the former directors may face as they respond to the various investigations mentioned earlier.

Say what you will about HP, the company has proved that it's very good at handling a crisis badly. The debacle, however, is good news for ex-CEO Carly "I'm too sexy for my web site" Fiorina, who has a memoir coming out next month.

HP first revealed the spy scandal on Sept. 6 - Fiorina's birthday. Someone is getting the last laugh. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.