Feeds

HP's snowballing shame

Buggin' hell

Build a business case: developing custom apps

And the hits just keep on coming. The latest embarrassments for HP include claims of bugging its own chief executive, attempting to install a trojan on a reporter's computer, and the forthcoming spectacle of their ousted chairwoman hauled before a congressional committee.

Patricia Dunn, who was allowed to quietly shuffle away from the chair by the rest of the HP board, will appear before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce in hearings beginning September 28.

The committee will vote today on whether to assume powers to fast-track subpoenas to squeeze HP for information. So far HP's submissions on the reporter scandal have been voluntary.

Like the Californian Attorney General and FBI, Congress' interest has been piqued by allegations of "pretexting" - where private investigators illegally obtain phone records under false pretenses.

The New York Times reports one of the CNET reporters targeted by HP's goons also received a document from them via email with an embedded trojan. The spying program failed to install itself correctly however.

And in yet another twist, The San Jose Mercury reports Carly Fiorina, predecessor as chairman, CEO and president, to the recently promoted Mark Hurd, was spied on by her own investigation. Fiorina, eager to trace the source of leaks, launched the orignal bugging operation in 2005.

HP's crisis management PR machine is struggling with the snowballing scandal. Spokesman Ryan Donovan said Monday: "The only thing I would say about the current investigation is the intent was the right intent. Information was leaked from the company that was potentially damaging and had ability to move stocks, which is not a good thing."

Call us naïve, Ryan, but we reckon investors prefer the movement of stock to be based on information rather than no information, damaging or not. In fact - hold the phone - isn't that how a market economy is supposed to work? ®

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

More from The Register

next story
Kate Bush: Don't make me HAVE CONTACT with your iPHONE
Can't face sea of wobbling fondle implements. What happened to lighters, eh?
Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
Caught red-handed: UK cops, PCSOs, specials behaving badly… on social media
No Mr Fuzz, don't ask a crime victim to be your pal on Facebook
Ballmer leaves Microsoft board to spend more time with his b-balls
From Clippy to Clippers: Hi, I see you're running an NBA team now ...
Online tat bazaar eBay coughs to YET ANOTHER outage
Web-based flea market struck dumb by size and scale of fail
Amazon takes swipe at PayPal, Square with card reader for mobes
Etailer plans to undercut rivals with low transaction fee offer
Assange™: Hey world, I'M STILL HERE, ignore that Snowden guy
Press conference: ME ME ME ME ME ME ME (cont'd pg 94)
Call of Duty daddy considers launching own movie studio
Activision Blizzard might like quality control of a CoD film
US regulators OK sale of IBM's x86 server biz to Lenovo
Now all that remains is for gov't offices to ban the boxes
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.