Feeds

Warner Music embraces YouTube

False dawn, or new era for bandwidth benefactor?

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Warner Music Group (WMG) has broken ranks with its fellow music majors and is climbing into bed with YouTube. The record label will use the video hosting phenomenon to distribute music videos and extras such as interviews with bands, and documentaries. Also, YouTube users can tap WMG’s music catalogue for backing on videos they make and upload onto the service.

This does not signify that WMG is giving its blessing to freeloaders: it will use YouTube's "advanced content identification and royalty reporting system, set for release by the end of the year". The two companies will also share advertising revenues on WMG videos uploaded onto YouTube.

According to WMG, the YouTube deal will enable artists to connect with a vast audience in an "entirely new way". Warner Music boss Edgar Bronfman says: "As user-generated content becomes more prevalent, this kind of partnership will allow music fans to celebrate the music of their favorite artists, enable artists to reach consumers in new ways, and ensure that copyright holders and artists are fairly compensated."

Chad Hurley, YouTube's CEO, says the deal is a significant milestone for the company. "By providing a new distribution opportunity, we are paving the way for media companies to harness the vast financial potential of user-generated content on YouTube. We are thrilled that WMG had the vision to be the first music company, in partnership with its artists, to support the use of their content within user videos and to allow our community to interact with WMG music in new creative ways."

Chad is laying it on with a trowel, but one can understand his relief in finding a big backer, which could turn the bandwidth benefactor into a revenue generator. Maybe. And also his relief in finding a big backer who might encourage others to lay off the lawsuits.

That's a very big maybe. Universal Music, the world's biggest music major, for one is unimpressed. Last week, UMG boss Doug Morris fired across the bows of YouTube, and others. "We believe these new businesses are copyright infringers and owe us tens of millions of dollars," he told a conference, "How we deal with these companies will be revealed shortly."

The world+dog has interpreted this as a threat to sue YouTube. Indeed, it is a miracle that the company has escaped so long from reprisals. Forget all the hype about the user-generated content, it is the user-stolen content that concerns copyright owners.

In a pugnacious piece on his blog, Mark Cuban, forecasts the coming dramatic decline of YouTube. Cuban, a billionaire who knows a thing or two about bubble companies, likens YouTube to pre-legal Napster. The comparison is instructive. ®

Related link

Warner Music press release

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Twitter: La la la, we have not heard of any NUDE JLaw, Upton SELFIES
If there are any on our site it is not our fault as we are not a PUBLISHER
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.