Feeds
90%
Asus_P5B_Deluxe_tn

Asus P5B Deluxe Wi-Fi AP motherboard

Core 2 Duo ready

Top 5 reasons to deploy VMware with Tegile

A pair of Marvell driven RJ-45 Gigabit Ethernet ports take ample care of your network needs, while audio is piped in and out via six 3.5mm jacks giving full support for up to eight channels, plus line in and microphone input. All this is handled by an Analog Devices SoundMAX AD1988B HD CODEC. A supplied SoundMAX branded Superbeam array microphone rounds off an impressive audio package, by using advanced techniques to filter out unwanted background noise and echo as well as it isolates vocal inputs, thus giving a supposed near headset-like performance.

Asus_P5B_Deluxe_sysmark

The final connector on the rear panel is for the bundled omni-directional wireless antenna. Wireless is implemented on the P5B by means of a daughter riser card running directly off one of the board’s USB headers placed alongside the rear connectors. At its heart is the Realtek RTL8187L USB 2.0 controller serving up 802.11a/b/g modes along with 64 station software access point functionality. It’s interesting that ASUS refer to the wireless support as embedded rather than integrated by virtue of the fact that it plugs in rather than being soldered onto the board.

The antenna is nicely styled but not terribly sensitive so you may want something a little more effective for marginal reception areas.

Memory support is excellent with up to 8GB of dual channel DDR2 supported across four memory slots. Chipset support stops at 800MHz, but ASUS offer an 889MHz and a 1066MHz (1:1) option when running at 1066MHz FSB. We were able to run our pair of 512MB Kingston PC2-8500 modules at 1066MHz 5-5-5-15 at 2.2V or at 800MHz 4-4-4-12 at 1.8Vwith absolutely no bother at all.

We then tried running the memory at 1066MHz at 4-4-4-12, more from curiosity than expectation, I was fairly surprised to see it not only boot up but then proceed to run in a stable manner. We've also included the PCMark results for this setting, though the overall score took a dip thanks to primarily reduced HDD performance.

Testing was performed using an Intel Core 2 Duo E6700 processor, 1GB of Kingston DDR2-8500 memory, an ATi Radeon X1900XTX, a Seagate Barracuda 7200.7 hard drive and a 420 watt Tagan PSU.

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Next page: Verdict

More from The Register

next story
Fujitsu CTO: We'll be 3D-printing tech execs in 15 years
Fleshy techie disses network neutrality, helmet-less motorcyclists
Space Commanders rebel as Elite:Dangerous kills offline mode
Frontier cops an epic kicking in its own forums ahead of December revival
Intel's LAME DUCK mobile chips gobbled by CASH COW
Chipzilla won't have money-losing mobe unit to kick about anymore
First in line to order a Nexus 6? AT&T has a BRICK for you
Black Screen of Death plagues early Google-mobe batch
Ford's B-Max: Fiesta-based runaround that goes THUNK
... when you close the slidey doors, that is ...
prev story

Whitepapers

Choosing cloud Backup services
Demystify how you can address your data protection needs in your small- to medium-sized business and select the best online backup service to meet your needs.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?