Feeds

Bragg makes MySpace admission

'We'd never actually read the Ts and Cs'

Top three mobile application threats

Billy Bragg had never read the rules for MySpace before hosting his music there, the singer has admitted. Bragg made the admission after convincing the site to alter its terms and conditions to safeguard the intellectual property rights of musicians.

Bragg said that sites such as MySpace could help young musicians rewrite the rules of the music industry, but only if their rights are protected. He was speaking in today's edition of OUT-LAW Radio, the weekly technology podcast.

Bragg has recently won battles with MySpace and Bebo over the sites' terms and conditions, forcing the sites to make it clear that they have no claim to material posted there.

"I was concerned about people coming into MySpace for the first time, people coming into the new industry for the first time. I don't want to find out in 25 years time that 20 per cent of my earnings are owned by Apple or whoever. I want the right to be able to exploit my own back catalogue," he said. "If I choose to sign that away to someone for life of copyright that's my choice but before that happens I want kids to know what that means and what the ramifications of that are."

Bragg had posted his music on the site but withdrew it when he realised the site appeared to claim rights over his music. "Like the majority of people who posted stuff on MySpace we'd never actually read right through the terms and conditions," he admitted. MySpace is reported to be home to 2.2m bands.

"The idea of giving someone that kind of licence – it's phenomenal, huge coverage. I wouldn't give someone that kind of licence if they were giving me an advance, never mind on a free service. I said we wouldn't put anything up until this had been changed or clarified."

Bragg has praised MySpace for its swift action in issuing new terms and conditions explicitly saying that material belonged to its creators, saying that the company acted "in the spirit of the internet".

"The thing I'm most delighted about is that the principle of the right of the producer of the material to ownership of the right to exploit their own material seems to have been established on the largest internet community site of them all, which is MySpace," he said.

Previously, MySpace's rules said that a user would "hereby grant to MySpace.com a non-exclusive, fully-paid and royalty-free, worldwide license (with the right to sublicense through unlimited levels of sublicensees) to use, copy, modify, adapt, translate, publicly perform, publicly display, store, reproduce, transmit, and distribute such content on and through the services."

The new conditions read: "MySpace.com does not claim any ownership rights in the text, files, images, photos, video, sounds, musical works, works of authorship, or any other materials (collectively, 'content') that you post to the MySpace services. After posting your content to the MySpace services, you continue to retain all ownership rights in such content, and you continue to have the right to use your content in any way you choose."

Hear the interview: OUT-LAW Radio 

Copyright © 2006, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
Sorry London, Europe's top tech city is Munich
New 'Atlas of ICT Activity' finds innovation isn't happening at Silicon Roundabout
MtGox chief Karpelès refuses to come to US for g-men's grilling
Bitcoin baron says he needs another lawyer for FinCEN chat
Dropbox defends fantastically badly timed Condoleezza Rice appointment
'Nothing is going to change with Dr. Rice's appointment,' file sharer promises
Audio fans, prepare yourself for the Second Coming ... of Blu-ray
High Fidelity Pure Audio – is this what your ears have been waiting for?
Did a date calculation bug just cost hard-up Co-op Bank £110m?
And just when Brit banking org needs £400m to stay afloat
Zucker punched: Google gobbles Facebook-wooed Titan Aerospace
Up, up and away in my beautiful balloon flying broadband-bot
Apple DOMINATES the Valley, rakes in more profit than Google, HP, Intel, Cisco COMBINED
Cook & Co. also pay more taxes than those four worthies PLUS eBay and Oracle
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a defence for mobile apps
In this whitepaper learn the various considerations for defending mobile applications; from the mobile application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies needed to properly assess mobile applications risk.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.