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Nvidia GeForce 7100 GS slips out

Quiet launch

Business security measures using SSL

Nvidia has quietly rolled out the GeForce 7100 graphics chip family at the bottom end of its GeForce 7 series of GPUs. For now, though, there's only one member - the 7100 GS - but at least three card companies have announced boards based on the part.

The 7100 GS contains four pixel shaders like the GeForce 7300 LE. Both chips connect to DDR 2 video memory across a 64-bit, single-channel bus and clocked to 600MHz. However, while the 7300 LE's core runs at 450MHz, the 7100 GS is clocked to 350MHz.

That yields a fill rate of just 1.4bn pixels per second. The chip can process 263m vertices each second.

Boards based on the 7100 GS fit into a PCI Express x16 slot and provide DVI and HDTV outputs. The cards are compatible with Nvidia's SLI multi-GPU technology.

nvidia 7100 gs boards from Inno3D and Sparkle

Among the companies who've already announced 7100 GS-based boards are PixelView, which is shipping a card with 128MB of memory expandable to 512MB using system RAM accessed by the chip's TurboCache technology. Sparkle announced a similar product, as did Inno3D. ®

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