Feeds

Japan tells Apple to probe burning battery problem

Risk of big fires fines if it doesn't

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Japan's trade ministry has given Apple a week to explain why one of the Mac maker's notebooks allegedly burst into flames in April this year and to detail what's being done to make sure the incident isn't repeated.

The Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry yesterday revealed one owner of an iBook G4 received minor injuries after their computer caught fire. According to a Ministry statement cited by Agence France Presse, the machine contained a Sony-made battery.

The Ministry's revelation comes a week after Apple announced it would replace 1.8m batteries shipped with a variety of its iBook and PowerBook laptop computers sold between October 2003 and August 2006.

On 14 August, Dell said it was recalling 4.1m notebook batteries after a spate of reports of laptops catching fire. At that point, only a single instance of an Apple machine going up in smoke had been reported. That incident took place in Norway.

Sony has been named as the battery supplier behind both the Apple and Dell recalls. Both Sony and Dell have also been asked to make a formal report to the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. ®

Intelligent flash storage arrays

Whitepapers

Designing and building an open ITOA architecture
Learn about a new IT data taxonomy defined by the four data sources of IT visibility: wire, machine, agent, and synthetic data sets.
Why CIOs should rethink endpoint data protection in the age of mobility
Assessing trends in data protection, specifically with respect to mobile devices, BYOD, and remote employees.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.