Feeds

AOL software labelled as 'badware'

Health inspectors find fault with client code

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

Privacy watchdogs have slapped a health warning on the latest version of AOL's client software, AOL 9.0.

StopBadware.org, an academic project supported by the likes of Sun and Google that aims to establish a neighbourhood watch-style scheme to put pressure on purveyors of unsavoury programs, has taken the unusual step of classifying AOL's software as potentially damaging badware.

AOL's inclusion of bundled software apps and lack of transparency over additional installed components earned it the negative label.

"AOL has a long and storied history of being a leader in the fight against badware. AOL plainly does not belong in the same category as the all-too-prevalent garden variety badware providers. But the free version of AOL 9.0 that we tested, in our view, does not live up to the company's rich legacy," explained John Palfrey, co-director of StopBadware.org, in a posting on StopBadware.org's blog.

StopBadware.org wants AOL to be more upfront about the software components its client installs. It also wants the internet giant to provide an easier way of declining to install these components or of removing them once they are installed.

The pressure group says it has been pleased with AOL's reaction to its criticism, which is based on a preliminary analysis of AOL's software. AOL said it would review StopBadware.org's recommendations.

"No company has done more to fight malware than AOL," AOL spokesman Andrew Weinstein told News.com. "We're reviewing the suggestions made in the report, and we are taking steps to address them, as they mostly involve minor UI issues. ®

The essential guide to IT transformation

More from The Register

next story
Goog says patch⁵⁰ your Chrome
64-bit browser loads cat vids FIFTEEN PERCENT faster!
Chinese hackers spied on investigators of Flight MH370 - report
Classified data on flight's disappearance pinched
NIST to sysadmins: clean up your SSH mess
Too many keys, too badly managed
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
Researchers camouflage haxxor traps with fake application traffic
Honeypots sweetened to resemble actual workloads, complete with 'secure' logins
Attack flogged through shiny-clicky social media buttons
66,000 users popped by malicious Flash fudging add-on
prev story

Whitepapers

Best practices for enterprise data
Discussing how technology providers have innovated in order to solve new challenges, creating a new framework for enterprise data.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?