Feeds

Lack of love for Intel's 'Tulsa' chip bruises egos

Come on, guys, this chip is great

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Plenty of controversy will greet Intel's "Tulsa" processor for servers when it arrives next week.

Tulsa - a version of Xeon aimed at multi-processor servers - stands as Intel's last chip built on the speedy but power-hungry NetBurst architecture, and that's a sticky issue with some Intel insiders. Jeff Gilbert, one of Intel's leads behind Tulsa, said the company is at odds over how much backing to throw Tulsa's way. While the chip performs better than expected, its reliance on the NetBurst architecture makes it somewhat of a lame-duck.

"It deserves a little more attention than we seem to be getting - inside of the company at least," Gilbert said earlier this week, during a speech at the Hot Chips conference here.

On the plus side, Tulsa will slot into existing servers that use Intel's "Paxville MP" processors, meaning customers don't have to overhaul their systems. The dual-core, 3.4GHz chip should show up to 70 per cent higher performance than Paxville when Intel ships it on Aug. 29, according to Gilbert. In addition, it won't be the power hungry beast many expected, if you believe Intel's take.

"Tulsa will have leading performance and leading performance per watt at its introduction," Gilbert said.

Some might find that a tough line to swallow given Opteron's apparent edge on larger servers. In fact, Opteron laggards IBM and Dell have expanded their server lines just to slot in four-socket Opteron systems.

Intel has been building chips with its new Core architecture that compete more effectively against AMD's products.

Tulsa has already been making its way into customers' hands, despite missing out on a formal introduction. The chip follows Potomac and Paxville and boasts a 16MB L3 cache.

"As my grandmother used to say, a large cache hides a multitude of sin," Gilbert said, voicing Intel's larger chip design philosophy. ®

Choosing a cloud hosting partner with confidence

More from The Register

next story
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
NASA launches new climate model at SC14
75 days of supercomputing later ...
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
You think the CLOUD's insecure? It's BETTER than UK.GOV's DATA CENTRES
We don't even know where some of them ARE – Maude
DEATH by COMMENTS: WordPress XSS vuln is BIGGEST for YEARS
Trio of XSS turns attackers into admins
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
BOFH: WHERE did this 'fax-enabled' printer UPGRADE come from?
Don't worry about that cable, it's part of the config
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.