Feeds

BEA buffs up AquaLogic with Flashline

Repository thinking

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

BEA Systems has bought a self-styled asset management vendor in a deal beefing up BEA's AquaLogic family for service oriented architectures (SOAs).

BEA has acquired Flashline and will sell its repository for the management of software's metadata - which hastily been rebranded BEA AquaLogic Enterprise Repository - along with a registry BEA is already reselling from Systinet, a division of Mercury Interactive, which is in the process of being acquired by Hewlett-Packard. The Systinet product is sold as BEA AquaLogic Service Registry.

Financial terms of BEA's deal with Flashline were not released, but the employees, including founder and chief executive Charles Stack, are to join BEA's AquaLogic business group.

BEA is touting the use of Flashline's UDDI service registry with BEA AquaLogic Service Registry to manage the planning, design, rollout and maintenance of SOAs.

Flashline's began life in the re-usable software components market by offering a small library of components and a repository for storage, discovery and re-use of that software. The company began offering best practices and guidelines for the management of re-usable assets in 2003.

Last year, Flashline introduced updates aimed at tackling IT governance, compliance and SOA along with improvements to its integration adaptor for Eclipse and the launch of a new integration adaptor for CA's AllFusion Harvest Change Manager. The Eclipse plug-in allows users of Eclipse-based tooling to find and view components inside their environment. Integration with CA lets Flashline users view software assets stored in the Harvest code repository.

It is not clear whether, or how, BEA plans to integrate Flashline and Systinet. And, still missing from BEA's overall SOA picture, is a single integrated environment for design and composition of business processes and applications used in SOAs. The Flashline deal suggests that, with support for Eclipse, BEA might take the route of plugging into other vendors' composition environments via Eclipse.

SOA vision aside, BEA will no doubt also be interested in Flashline's customer list, which spans Fortune 500 businesses and federal agencies, as an immediate sales opportunity for BEA's Java and .NET products.®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
'Windows 9' LEAK: Microsoft's playing catchup with Linux
Multiple desktops and live tiles in restored Start button star in new vids
iOS 8 release: WebGL now runs everywhere. Hurrah for 3D graphics!
HTML 5's pretty neat ... when your browser supports it
'People have forgotten just how late the first iPhone arrived ...'
Plus: 'Google's IDEALISM is an injudicious justification for inappropriate biz practices'
Mathematica hits the Web
Wolfram embraces the cloud, promies private cloud cut of its number-cruncher
Mozilla shutters Labs, tells nobody it's been dead for five months
Staffer's blog reveals all as projects languish on GitHub
SUSE Linux owner Attachmate gobbled by Micro Focus for $2.3bn
Merger will lead to mainframe and COBOL powerhouse
iOS 8 Healthkit gets a bug SO Apple KILLS it. That's real healthcare!
Not fit for purpose on day of launch, says Cupertino
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.