Feeds

YouTube plans 'free-to-net' music vid downloads

Net video killed the radio star

The essential guide to IT transformation

YouTube is in negotiations with record labels over plans to post music videos online. The talks are part of the site's plans to expand beyond its roots as a community web site that allows users to post videos online to become a legitimate distributor of commercial video clips, among other ventures.

The site, which claims 100m views a day, is in talks to obtain rights to post music videos on the site that will be free for surfers to download, possibly supported by ad-based revenue. The business model for the delivery of music videos is undecided but YouTube has set itself the ambitious target of delivering a complete music video catalogue on a "free-to-net" basis.

"What we really want to do is in six to 12 months, maybe 18 months, to have every music video ever created up on YouTube," co-founder Steve Chen told Reuters. "We're trying to bring in as much of this content as we can on to the site."

If successful, the venture would provide stiff competition to pay-to-view or download services such as Apple's iTunes and AOL Music. YouTube claims that 60 per cent of videos watched online are delivered through its site. Many of these are homemade (often comical) video clips but copyrighted excerpts from TV shows and films are also frequently posted online through the site, much to the chagrin of the entertainment industry. YouTube has a instituted a policy of taking down pirated content upon notification. Nonetheless pirated content is easy to find on the site.

YouTube tentatively plans to integrate legitimately-obtained music videos into its community web pages allowing users to posts reviews. Warner Music Group and EMI confirmed to Reuters that they're in discussion with YouTube. YouTube plans to use this feature to differentiate its offering from Yahoo Music, which is supported by an ad revenue share model, and described by YouTube's Chen as a type of MTV for the net.

Michael Nash, senior vice-president of digital and business development at Warner Music, told Reuters that it was "interested in legitimate use scenarios and trying to broaden those. Our focus with YouTube is how to be partners while protecting our artists and ensuring they get paid," he added. ®

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
MEN WANTED to satisfy town full of yearning BRAZILIAN HOTNESS
'Prettier, better organised, more harmonious than if men were in charge'
Cops baffled by riddle of CHICKEN who crossed ROAD
'Officers were unable to determine Chicken's intent'
Yes, but what are your plans if a DRAGON attacks?
Local UK gov outs most ridiculous FoI requests...
Drunkards warned: If you can't walk in a straight line, don't shop online, you fool!
Put it away boys. Cover them up ladies. Your credit cards, we mean
Why your mum was WRONG about whiffy tattooed people
They're a future source of RENEWABLE ENERGY
Murder accused DIDN'T ask Siri 'how to hide my roommate'
US court hears of cached browser image - not actual request
Chomp that sausage: Brits just LOVE scoffing a Full Monty
Sales of traditional brekkie foods soar as hungry folk get their mitts greasy
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?