Feeds

YouTube plans 'free-to-net' music vid downloads

Net video killed the radio star

Remote control for virtualized desktops

YouTube is in negotiations with record labels over plans to post music videos online. The talks are part of the site's plans to expand beyond its roots as a community web site that allows users to post videos online to become a legitimate distributor of commercial video clips, among other ventures.

The site, which claims 100m views a day, is in talks to obtain rights to post music videos on the site that will be free for surfers to download, possibly supported by ad-based revenue. The business model for the delivery of music videos is undecided but YouTube has set itself the ambitious target of delivering a complete music video catalogue on a "free-to-net" basis.

"What we really want to do is in six to 12 months, maybe 18 months, to have every music video ever created up on YouTube," co-founder Steve Chen told Reuters. "We're trying to bring in as much of this content as we can on to the site."

If successful, the venture would provide stiff competition to pay-to-view or download services such as Apple's iTunes and AOL Music. YouTube claims that 60 per cent of videos watched online are delivered through its site. Many of these are homemade (often comical) video clips but copyrighted excerpts from TV shows and films are also frequently posted online through the site, much to the chagrin of the entertainment industry. YouTube has a instituted a policy of taking down pirated content upon notification. Nonetheless pirated content is easy to find on the site.

YouTube tentatively plans to integrate legitimately-obtained music videos into its community web pages allowing users to posts reviews. Warner Music Group and EMI confirmed to Reuters that they're in discussion with YouTube. YouTube plans to use this feature to differentiate its offering from Yahoo Music, which is supported by an ad revenue share model, and described by YouTube's Chen as a type of MTV for the net.

Michael Nash, senior vice-president of digital and business development at Warner Music, told Reuters that it was "interested in legitimate use scenarios and trying to broaden those. Our focus with YouTube is how to be partners while protecting our artists and ensuring they get paid," he added. ®

Security for virtualized datacentres

More from The Register

next story
MEN: For pity's sake SLEEP with LOTS of WOMEN - and avoid Prostate Cancer
And, um, don't sleep with other men. If that's what worries you
Jim Beam me up, Scotty! WHISKY from SPAAACE returns to Earth
They're insured for $1m, before you thirsty folks make plans
Now: The REAL APPLE NEWS you need to know
OMG! Gravity's totes amazeballs. Calm down, George Clooney, not your film
Boffins who stare at goats: I do believe they’re SHRINKING
Alpine chamois being squashed by global warming
Let's make an app that POSTS your POO to APPLE HQ
Plus: It's OPEN WARFARE in the Linux greybeard world
FedEx helps deliver THOUSANDS of spam messages DIRECT to its Blighty customers
Don't worry Wilson, I'll do all the paddling. You just hang on
Adorkable overshare of words like photobomb in this year's dictionaries
And hipsters are finally defined as self-loathing. Sort of
Not a loyal follower of @BritishMonarchy? You missed The QUEEN*'s first Tweet
Her Maj opens 'Information Age' at the Science Museum
prev story

Whitepapers

Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
New hybrid storage solutions
Tackling data challenges through emerging hybrid storage solutions that enable optimum database performance whilst managing costs and increasingly large data stores.
Getting ahead of the compliance curve
Learn about new services that make it easy to discover and manage certificates across the enterprise and how to get ahead of the compliance curve.