Feeds

AMD retaliates against Intel with Rev F release

Less magical, more practical

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

A more modest, less magical AMD released the new Revision F Opteron processors on Tuesday. The days when AMD could crow about broad, breathtaking performance advantages over Intel have vanished. Now AMD sells Opteron with a humbler pitch, one that revolves around consistency and high-end server gains for customers.

With Rev F, users will find a dual-core fleet of chips that top out at 2.6GHz. These new Opterons boast support for the AMD-V virtualisation technology and for DDR 2 memory. Intel has been shipping its virtualisation technology for some time and supports the more advanced but power-hungry FB-DIMM memory technology with its Xeon server chips.

Customers should expect to see a fair bit of manoeuvering from the server makers as they adjust to Rev Fs higher pin count of 1,207 connectors versus 940 pins in previous chips.

AMD has decided to ship three versions of the Rev F Opterons. Customers will see high efficiency parts that eat up 68W, regular parts that consume 95W and a special edition product that eats up 120W. In 1,000 unit quantities, the new chips range in price from $255 to $2,649.

You can expect the likes of Sun Microsystems, IBM, HP and Dell to roll out a wide variety of gear based on the new chip. Many of these vendors will stress Opteron's sustained performance edge over Intel's Xeon chip in larger, four-socket servers.

Intel has tried to counter AMD's high-end lead by trumpeting the upcoming release of a four-core Xeon in the fourth quarter. AMD today revealed that it does not expect a four-core Opteron until the middle of next year.

It now looks as if Intel and AMD will split various server benchmarks between them for some time. AMD, however, has urged customers to look past pure performance comparisons and see it as the more consistent processor manufacturer overall. AMD intends to keep its same, basic processor architecture for years to come, while Intel is expected to do another redesign in the near future to add technology, such as an integrated memory controller, to the Xeons. ®

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk

More from The Register

next story
TEEN RAMPAGE: Kids in iPhone 6 'Will it bend' YouTube 'prank'
iPhones bent in Norwich? As if the place wasn't weird enough
George Clooney, WikiLeaks' lawyer wife hand out burner phones to wedding guests
Day 4: 'News'-papers STILL rammed with Clooney nuptials
iPAD-FONDLING fanboi sparks SECURITY ALERT at Sydney airport
Breaches screening rules cos Apple SCREEN ROOLZ, ok?
Crouching tiger, FAST ASLEEP dragon: Smugglers can't shift iPhone 6s
China's grey market reports 'sluggish' sales of Apple mobe
Apple's new iPhone 6 vulnerable to last year's TouchID fingerprint hack
But unsophisticated thieves need not attempt this trick
The British Museum plonks digital bricks on world of Minecraft
Institution confirms it's cool with joining the blocky universe
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.
Security for virtualized datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.