Feeds

Cheshire's particle accelerator gets £2m cash injection

Putting Britian on the science map, DTI says

Bridging the IT gap between rising business demands and ageing tools

Scientists and engineers developing a new prototype particle accelerator at Daresbury Lab in Cheshire, will get an extra £2m from the government, the DTI announced yesterday, to add to the £14.8m already ploughed into the scheme.

The goal is to develop a world-class scientific research facility that will enable scientists to "study molecules working in real time, follow chemical reactions as they happen, look at potential drug molecules as they interact with cells, and examine the spin of electrons", the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) says.

The funding will provide scientists working on the Energy Recovery Linac Prototype (ERLP) with the resources they need to test some of the theories that underpin the so-called 4GLS (Fourth Generation Light Source) technology.

The 4GLS proposal is on the cutting edge of science, according to science minister Lord Sainsbury.

"Its potential capability is unique in the world and its capacity to combine a wide range of experiments would establish the UK and Daresbury as a major player in this technology," he said in a statement.

If the accelerator gets the go ahead it will use a combination of ERLP and free electron laser (FEL) technologies to produce sources of synchrotron radiation and FEL radiation, ranging from THz frequencies to the soft X-ray end of the spectrum.

The particle accelerator will be used for research into molecular and device function, rather than further probing structures in a static state.

When it is up and running, the scientists say it will advance the state of the art in diagnosing some cancers and prion-based diseases. It will have applications in a huge range of sciences, including astronomy, atmospheric research, nuclear physics, and nanotechnology.

A decision on building the full 4GLS is expected within 18 months to two years. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 claimed lives of HIV/AIDS cure scientists
Researchers, advocates, health workers among those on shot-down plane
Mwa-ha-ha-ha! Eccentric billionaire Musk gets his PRIVATE SPACEPORT
In the Lone Star State, perhaps appropriately enough
The Sun took a day off last week and made NO sunspots
Someone needs to get that lazy star cooking again before things get cold around here
All those new '5G standards'? Here's the science they rely on
Radio professor tells us how wireless will get faster in the real world
Diary note: Pluto's close-up is a year from … now!
New Horizons is less than a year from the dwarf planet
Boffins discuss AI space program at hush-hush IARPA confab
IBM, MIT, plenty of others invited to fill Uncle Sam's spy toolchest, but where's Google?
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.