Feeds

Sun tempts corporate JBuilder users

Working the uncertainty angle

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Sun Microsystems is targeting Borland Software's corporate developers in its campaign to encourage JBuilder users to migrate applications to NetBeans.

Sun is offering a special NetBeans migration workshop for JBuilder users that companies can make available to teams of developers, along with up to 60 days of free programming advice from its Sun developer expert assistance program.

Users interested in switching will receive email-based advice on programming, best practices and workarounds until October 14 under Sun's expert assistance program.

The offer extends Sun's previous efforts to get JBuilder users to adopt NetBeans and is designed to exploit uncertainty over the product's future in light of the fact Borland is selling JBuilder to an, as yet, unnamed purchaser. JBuilder is being spun out along with Borland's other tools, including the 20-year-old Delphi, and middleware products as the firm concentrates its R&D, sales and marketing dollars on IT governance and lifecycle management.

Having first told The Register in February it planned to put additional marketing dollars into wooing Borland’s users, Sun's update appears deliberately timed to coincide with an expected announcement from Borland, probably in the next few weeks, that it has finally landed a buyer for its orphaned products.

According to Sun, Borland has "discontinued investment in their tools," a claim hotly contested by Borland which is acutely sensitive to any suggestion it's dumping developers.

A spokeswoman for Borland said the company is: "Spinning out its tools business as a separate entity to increase investment in our IDE products and bring more focus to the individual developer tool market."

In May this year Borland published a three-year JBuilder product roadmap, which promised two updates to JBuilder 2006 this year along with the next major release, JBulder 2007, codenamed Peloton, which is expected during the fourth quarter.

According to Borland, Peloton will feature enhanced support for the visual design and development of Enterprise Java Beans and web services.

JBuilder 2008 and JBuilder 2009, due in late 2007 and 2008 respectively, will see support for open source tools and frameworks such as Spring and Hibernate, a so-called service oriented architecture "cockpit" and updates for EJB 3.0 and Java Enterprise Edition 5.0. For more details on Borland's roadmap click here

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
BBC: We're going to slip CODING into kids' TV
Pureed-carrot-in-ice cream C++ surprise
China: You, Microsoft. Office-Windows 'compatibility'. You have 20 days to explain
Told to cough up more details as antitrust probe goes deeper
Windows 7 settles as Windows XP use finally starts to slip … a bit
And at the back of the field, Windows 8.1 is sprinting away from Windows 8
Linux turns 23 and Linus Torvalds celebrates as only he can
No, not with swearing, but by controlling the release cycle
Scratched PC-dispatch patch patched, hatched in batch rematch
Windows security update fixed after triggering blue screens (and screams) of death
This is how I set about making a fortune with my own startup
Would you leave your well-paid job to chase your dream?
prev story

Whitepapers

Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?