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PSP-friendly Wi-Fi network to go live tomorrow

Rolling out across Europe. And Australia.

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Sony will tomorrow launch its PlayStation Portable-oriented Wi-Fi hotspot network, though with only 11 sites, perhaps 'network' isn't the right word, particularly given the 7,500 hotspots that are part of rival Nintendo's Wi-Fi Connection for the DS.

sony playstation spot wi-fi network

PlayStation Spot is centred on game retailers in London, Milton Keynes, Bristol, Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Glasgow and Edinburgh. The service provides PSP owners with a way to download content, including games demos, songs, videos and pictures. The material is only available via PlayStation Spot, Sony said.

How much of this will be free of charge remains to be seen. While access to the wireless network surely will be, PSP owners may have to cough up for the content. Sony pledged some content will be free, however.

The UK roll-out is part of a Europewide launch which also includes Australia - it's a PAL thing. In total, some 300 PlayStation Spots will go live tomorrow. ®

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