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Only one in seven switch off their phones during sex

Leave on vibrate?

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A survey into Brit's MobileLifestyles™ has revealed a paltry 14 per cent have the courtesy to switch off during sex with their partner, lest they get a txt msg from their m8 asking if they fncy a pnt.

More than one fifth of the 18 to 24 year old category, or the Generation Mobile tribe to give them their approved marketing wonk's moniker, have ditched someone or been sent to Dumpsville themselves via SMS.

In fact, the study by Carphone Warehouse and the London School of Economics found texting has usurped voice calling as the main thing people use their phones for. The all-conquering rise of the mobile phone is illustrated by the shocking finding that young adults place it above even television as the most revered bit of electrical kit.

According to Carphone Warehouse boss Charles Dunstone, mobiles have become "the social glue that connects us". Unless you've had your social glue nicked, that is: overall one in 10 say they've had a phone stolen, with the rate among young women almost double that.

We wonder if that statistic is related to another uncovered by the survey though. More than half of young women said they get their phone out to ward off unwanted approaches from men. Although a super-sassy move, it's an approach unlikely to ward of a mobile phone thief...

"In our fragmented society, mobile phones have become the new garden fence, the new village green," Dunstone continued, presumably implying the old garden fence has been knocked down by a crack-honking joyrider, and everyone else is ASBO-slapped to within an inch of borstal, so we're not allowed on the village green any more.

More details for Strategy Boutiques, futurologists, and the unemployed are available at the Flashtastic Mobile Life website here. Txt u l8r.®

Bootnote

Most worryingly for we at Vulture Central, camera phones are facilitating a rise in would-be citizen journalists, with more than a third of the 16,500 questioned claiming they would be Johnny on the Spot, recording the news if the opportunity presented itself. We got the benefit of this too recently though, when thanks to reader Phil Jones, we got the only picture of lanky pornographer/rapper Snoop Dogg and posse poised to smash the shizzle out of Heathrow.

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