Feeds

HP finally gets its own vision and can sell it too

'We learned'

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

Analysis It used to take HP about two days, ten executives and 20,000 words to near a coherent explanation of the Adaptive Enterprise. Thankfully, the company has put that ugly past behind it and can now describe its overarching strategy in a quick, palatable fashion.

The Adaptive Enterprise came to life under former CEO Carly Fiorina. At the most basic level, it stood as HP's catch all phrase to distinguish its sales approach from that of IBM, primarily, and also the likes of Sun Microsystems, Dell and EMC. Under the Adaptive Enterprise, customers were meant to sling around technology resources with ease. Applications would magically make their way to powerful servers when they sensed increased demand, storage systems would configure themselves into one, giant array, and robots would hover over your raised floor, blowing on boxes to keep them cool.

This vision - because that's all it was - culminated with the Utility Data Center package, which was a bunch of hardware and software wrapped in Fiorina's vague hokum.

HP has since scrapped the Utility Data Center idea and has something quite different to ship to customers these days.

"We learned," said Lin Nease, HP's director of technology strategy for servers and storage, during a meeting today with reporters at the company's headquarters.

Rather than selling customers a massive data center of the future, HP wants to ship smaller bits and pieces now, and then refine those components over time. The idea here is to add intelligence to your data center where appropriate with the hopes that you'll eventually craft a cheaper system that requires less space and less management.

Like any vendor, HP still coats its sales pitch with mounds of buzzwords and piles of ambiguity. But that's not to say there isn't something concrete lurking underneath the marketing goo.

The major premise that HP is working off comes from data that says the average customer spends about 90 per cent of its technology funds on maintenance, migrations, updates and other operational functions. That leaves only about 10 per cent of a company's budget to spend on new technology projects.

HP plans to improve that ratio by focusing on six areas - services, power and cooling, management, security, virtualization and automation. Spending too much time on HP's broad ambitions with each of these elements wouldn't do much good, so let's try and peg a couple of specifics.

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
NSA SOURCE CODE LEAK: Information slurp tools to appear online
Now you can run your own intelligence agency
Azure TITSUP caused by INFINITE LOOP
Fat fingered geo-block kept Aussies in the dark
Yahoo! blames! MONSTER! email! OUTAGE! on! CUT! CABLE! bungle!
Weekend woe for BT as telco struggles to restore service
Cloud unicorns are extinct so DiData cloud mess was YOUR fault
Applications need to be built to handle TITSUP incidents
Stop the IoT revolution! We need to figure out packet sizes first
Researchers test 802.15.4 and find we know nuh-think! about large scale sensor network ops
Turnbull should spare us all airline-magazine-grade cloud hype
Box-hugger is not a dirty word, Minister. Box-huggers make the cloud WORK
SanDisk vows: We'll have a 16TB SSD WHOPPER by 2016
Flash WORM has a serious use for archived photos and videos
Astro-boffins start opening universe simulation data
Got a supercomputer? Want to simulate a universe? Here you go
Microsoft adds video offering to Office 365. Oh NOES, you'll need Adobe Flash
Lovely presentations... but not on your Flash-hating mobe
prev story

Whitepapers

Free virtual appliance for wire data analytics
The ExtraHop Discovery Edition is a free virtual appliance will help you to discover the performance of your applications across the network, web, VDI, database, and storage tiers.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
5 critical considerations for enterprise cloud backup
Key considerations when evaluating cloud backup solutions to ensure adequate protection security and availability of enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.