Feeds
80%

CoPilot Live 6 for Symbian

Sat Nav for your Series 60 phone

Protecting against web application threats using SSL

Review ALK Technologies' CoPilot Live has been at the forefront of Windows Mobile-based satellite navigation software for some time, but it's a relative newcomer to the Symbian operating system, offering a version of its route-planning application - now at version 6 - for Nokia's Series 60 user-interface only this year...

UK carrier T-Mobile began bundling CoPilot with some of its Windows Mobile devices last Autumn, so it was only a matter of time before it began pairing up Series 60 phones with ALK's Symbian-oriented offering. At the moment, it's pushing Nokia's N70 3G phone with CoPilot, and T-Mobile lent us a set to try out. We reviewed the N70 on its own a little while back. Now it's time to take a look at the navigation side of the story.

alk copilot live 6 for symbian

CoPilot ships on an RS-MMC card ready to be slotted into the N70. There's a licence code to enter first, then a brief activation period while the software emails home from the phone to confirm it's a genuine copy. Once all that's done, you're ready to go, though you've a three-day grace period so it's not necessary to activate the product immediately.

ALK's software ships with a branded Bluetooth GPS receiver based on SiRF's SiRFStar III chip - probably the best GPS chip there is. Certainly, I was able to get a satellite fix quickly and accurately even though I was sitting at my desk in the office with a further storey and the roof above me. Unlike the Bluetooth receiver rival Symbian sat nav seller Navicore provides, ALK's isn't compatible with the N70's AC adaptor. ALK only bundles an in-car cigarette lighter adaptor, so you can't charge up your receiver and pair it to the phone out of your vehicle. Since CoPilot Live for Symbian is so tightly tied to the N70, it's disappointing ALK didn't at least include an adaptor cable allowing you to charge the receiver using the N70's power plug.

Another drawback is the software's insistence you have the Bluetooth receiver paired and connected before you continue. I don't recall this being an issue with past versions of CoPilot I've looked at, but trying to run CoPilot on the N70 without the GPS receiver turned on automatically shut down the app every time. Sometimes it's handy to plot a journey then review the route before you travel, and you don't always want to do this sitting in your car just before setting off.

Reducing the cost and complexity of web vulnerability management

More from The Register

next story
PORTAL TO ELSEWHERE scried in small galaxy far, far away
Supermassive black hole dominates titchy star formation
Bacon-related medical breakthrough wins Ig Nobel prize
Is there ANYTHING cured pork can't do?
Boffins say they've got Lithium batteries the wrong way around
Surprises at the nano-scale mean our ideas about how they charge could be all wrong
Edge Research Lab to tackle chilly LOHAN's final test flight
Our US allies to probe potential Vulture 2 servo freeze
Europe prepares to INVADE comet: Rosetta landing site chosen
No word yet on whether backup site is labelled 'K'
Cracked it - Vulture 2 power podule fires servos for 4 HOURS
Pixhawk avionics juice issue sorted, onwards to Spaceport America
Archaeologists and robots on hunt for more Antikythera pieces
How much of the world's oldest computer can they find?
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.