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Monster roadsigns block Channel Five

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Residents close to a Buckinghamshire A-road are up in arms at giant roadsigns which are not only ruining views of the countryside but, far worse, blocking reception of Channel Five.

According to a report on This is Local London, the powers that be in Bucks erected the monster signs along Bradenham Road, near Wycombe, in an attempt to combat speeding along a stretch of highway "notorious for accidents".

The new signage indicates a new 40mph limit, but local resident Susan Carter reckons it's done little to improve matters. Rather, she is now unable to receive the top-quality programming discerning Bucks viewers demand.

Carter explained: "These signs are huge. They are ruining the countryside views and since they were put up we cannot get Channel Five on our TV upstairs. It could be a coincidence but I don't think so. Wherever else you look there are smaller signs telling you the speed limit, so why do we need such great big ones?"

Making the most of the time now freed up by the absence of Channel Five, Carter further elaborated: "There has always been a problem with speed in this road but it seems that since they put up these signs the problem has got worse.

"The speed limit in this road is never enforced. People know they can get away with speeding. If the police were here with a camera I think it would make a big difference. I think there could be more accidents in the future. The new speed limits haven't made a difference at all."

Dan Campsall, from the Thames Valley Safer Roads Partnership, noted that "enforcement" of a new speed limit zone would not normally start "for at least six months to give drivers a chance to adapt".

And while the locals await the arrival of the Gatsos, Buckinghamshire County Council local area coordinator for transport, Ian Reed, said the council was "trying to establish whether these signs would interfere with somebody's tevlevision". He concluded: "We will be reviewing them and if there are issues they will be looked at." ®

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