Feeds

Monster roadsigns block Channel Five

Good news for Bucks residents

Remote control for virtualized desktops

Residents close to a Buckinghamshire A-road are up in arms at giant roadsigns which are not only ruining views of the countryside but, far worse, blocking reception of Channel Five.

According to a report on This is Local London, the powers that be in Bucks erected the monster signs along Bradenham Road, near Wycombe, in an attempt to combat speeding along a stretch of highway "notorious for accidents".

The new signage indicates a new 40mph limit, but local resident Susan Carter reckons it's done little to improve matters. Rather, she is now unable to receive the top-quality programming discerning Bucks viewers demand.

Carter explained: "These signs are huge. They are ruining the countryside views and since they were put up we cannot get Channel Five on our TV upstairs. It could be a coincidence but I don't think so. Wherever else you look there are smaller signs telling you the speed limit, so why do we need such great big ones?"

Making the most of the time now freed up by the absence of Channel Five, Carter further elaborated: "There has always been a problem with speed in this road but it seems that since they put up these signs the problem has got worse.

"The speed limit in this road is never enforced. People know they can get away with speeding. If the police were here with a camera I think it would make a big difference. I think there could be more accidents in the future. The new speed limits haven't made a difference at all."

Dan Campsall, from the Thames Valley Safer Roads Partnership, noted that "enforcement" of a new speed limit zone would not normally start "for at least six months to give drivers a chance to adapt".

And while the locals await the arrival of the Gatsos, Buckinghamshire County Council local area coordinator for transport, Ian Reed, said the council was "trying to establish whether these signs would interfere with somebody's tevlevision". He concluded: "We will be reviewing them and if there are issues they will be looked at." ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Criticism of Uber's journo-Data Analytics plan is an Attack on DIGITAL FREEDOM
First they came for Emil – and I'm damn well SPEAKING OUT
'It is comforting to know where your data centres are.' UK.GOV does NOT
Plus: Anons are 'wannabes', KKK says, before being pwned
Google's whois results say it's a lousy smut searcher
Run whois google.com or whois microsoft.com. We dare you, you PIG◙◙◙◙ER
Holy vintage vehicles! Earliest known official Batmobile goes on sale
Riddle me this: are you prepared to pay US$180k?
'Open source just means big companies can steal your code.' O RLY?
Plus: Flame of the Week returns, for one night only!
NEWSFLASH: It's time to ditch dullard Facebook chums
Everything hot in tech, courtesy of avian anchor Regina Eggbert
Hey, you, PHONE-FACE! Kickstarter in-car mobe mount will EMBED your phone into your MUG
Stick it on the steering wheel and wait for the airbag to fire
prev story

Whitepapers

Free virtual appliance for wire data analytics
The ExtraHop Discovery Edition is a free virtual appliance will help you to discover the performance of your applications across the network, web, VDI, database, and storage tiers.
A strategic approach to identity relationship management
ForgeRock commissioned Forrester to evaluate companies’ IAM practices and requirements when it comes to customer-facing scenarios versus employee-facing ones.
10 threats to successful enterprise endpoint backup
10 threats to a successful backup including issues with BYOD, slow backups and ineffective security.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Website security in corporate America
Find out how you rank among other IT managers testing your website's vulnerabilities.