Feeds

Galileo codes cracked

Security by obscurity fails again

Seven Steps to Software Security

The secret codes used by Europe's Galileo navigation satellite have been broken by researchers at Cornell University.

A team from Cornell's Global Positioning System Laboratory succeeded in cracking so-called pseudo random number (PRN) codes of Europe's first global navigation satellite, despite attempts to keep the data under wraps.

The development means "free access" for consumers who use navigation devices that would need PRNs to access satellite data from Galileo, according to the team from Cornell.

The $4bn Galileo project is Europe's answer to the United States' GPS system. Unlike the US system, where the signal is provided at no cost, Galileo must make money for its investors, presumably by charging a fee for PRN codes. The discovery from Cornell would undermine such a model, at least in theory. Galileo is still in the process of development.

The cryptographic attack developed by the Cornell team targeted GIOVE-A (Galileo In-Orbit Validation Element-A), a prototype for the 30 satellites that will make up the Galileo system by 2010. Galileo and GPS share frequency bandwidths. Because of this, some of Galileo's PRN codes must be "open source". Thus far, however, none of GIOVE-A's codes have been made public since it went live in early January. Researchers from Cornell and in Germany were politely refused access to these codes, so the Cornell team decide to extract them independently.

"It dawned on me: maybe we can pull these things off the air, just with an antenna and lots of signal processing," explained Mark Psiaki, professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Cornell and co-leader of Cornell's GPS Laboratory.

Psiaki's group consulted with Cornell's university counsel to allay concerns that cracking the code might be considered a copyright infringement.

"We were told that cracking the encryption of creative content, like music or a movie, is illegal, but the encryption used by a navigation signal is fair game," said Psiaki, who compared the work of his team on Galileo to working out the frequency of light flashes and co-ordinates of a lighthouse. "The Europeans cannot copyright basic data about the physical world, even if the data is coming from a satellite that they built," he added.

Under pressure, Galileo published PRN codes in mid-April but these labeled some open source codes as intellectual property, incorrectly claiming a license was required for any commercial receiver. Furthermore, the codes published were not those currently used by the GIOVE-A satellite.

The Cornell team published these codes - along with the methods used to extract them - in the June issue of GPS World. Cryptography experts point to the case as illustrating the futility of relying on secret data as opposed to more robust encryption schemes as an approach to system security.

"Security by obscurity: it doesn't work, and it's a royal pain to recover when it fails," said crypto guru Bruce Schneier in a blog posting. ®

Mobile application security vulnerability report

More from The Register

next story
Yorkshire cops fail to grasp principle behind BT Fon Wi-Fi network
'Prevent people that are passing by to hook up to your network', pleads plod
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NEW, SINISTER web tracking tech fingerprints your computer by making it draw
Have you been on YouPorn lately, perhaps? White House website?
LibreSSL RNG bug fix: What's all the forking fuss about, ask devs
Blow to bit-spitter 'tis but a flesh wound, claim team
Attackers raid SWISS BANKS with DNS and malware bombs
'Retefe' trojan uses clever spin on old attacks to grant total control of bank accounts
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
Don't look, Snowden: Security biz chases Tails with zero-day flaws alert
Exodus vows not to sell secrets of whistleblower's favorite OS
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.