Feeds

Sun takes the Opteron highroad

Where blades are bloated and oddities thrive

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

With these three systems, Sun looks a lot more like a real x86 server vendor. It now has general purpose kit that covers the two-socket to eight-socket market in style. It also has a unique system and some blades, ending a very embarrassing period where Sun - the only major pure server vendor - didn't play in the fastest growing part of the server market.

The new boxes should provide a decent feel for how well Sun has assessed the x86 market and how much of an impact Bechtolsheim's return has made on the company. This is the second generation of Becky gear.

Sun always cracks us up by waiting to release a lot of servers at once in some kind of shock and awe exercise and then botching the actual launch.

First off, a lot of this hardware should have appeared last year. We can't seem to figure out what delays Sun's hardware production cycles again and again and again, but something is not right. Pushing out all of this gear at once just draws attention to this fact.

Then, you've got the x4600, which has been on sale for quite a few weeks. Sun tried to keep this box a secret for reasons that we can't figure out.

Lastly, you get Sun announcing the blade chassis but not the blades. Only those with a price list find the x8400 four-socket systems, while the two-socket blades are still MIA.

It's hard for us to understand why Sun couldn't have told a clear story around the x4600 and x4500 and actually explained what these servers can do in its press releases and interviews and then followed that release in a month or so with another clear story around the blades - perhaps even when it had the blades ready.

If this kind of thing is frustrating to us, we know it must be to customers as well.

Rant aside, Sun has taken the necessary steps toward boosting its x86 server revenue in a meaningful way, which is a must for the company. Focusing on the high-end of the market seems a solid approach for a company familiar in that territory. It limits Sun's volume assault - especially in blades - but lets it play off the strength of Solaris and Sun's sales knowhow.

And, heck, if customers start dumping Unix workloads onto eight-socket Opteron boxes, at least Sun will be the one doing the replacement. ®

Best practices for enterprise data

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Microsoft says 'weird things' can happen during Windows Server 2003 migrations
Fix coming for bug that makes Kerberos croak when you run two domain controllers
Cisco says network virtualisation won't pay off everywhere
Another sign of strain in the Borg/VMware relationship?
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?