Feeds

Dell hands out plug for Sun CEO

That'll keep you, er, loud

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration

One of the few redeeming qualities Dell had left was its home base in Central Texas. The Lonestar State angle backed up Dell's hard-nosed, direct model approach to selling computers. The Texas toughness helped explain Dell's behavior over the years when the vendor ignored namby-pamby customer complaints in favor of always lowering prices.

Well, Dell has done away with its Texas grit by this month putting on a Web 2.0 skirt and swishing around in front of us all via its new blog.

We're told that "One2One" follows Dell's direct model by having "direct conversations" with customers. Although, we wonder how many customers care what some Dell blogger thinks about Robert Scoble's breakfast choices and question how one-to-one a blog is. Wouldn't having someone who answers a customer service line with a functional grasp of English be a tad more direct?

The blog itself isn't actually that bad, if you ignore the Dell bloggers writing about what other bloggers think of the Dell blog - rinse, repeat. Dell has different people presenting hardware or customer service tools and explaining how the stuff works. It's obvious that someone convinced Dell a blog might help solve some of its PR issues, and providing product tutorials is a decent enough path for the company to take once it committed to the blog idea.

What's really embarrassing, however, is Dell's link to Sun Microsystems CEO Jonathan Schwartz's blog. A Dell blogger justifies this decision by saying, "Robert Scoble told us to listen, and to link to the folks who don't like us."

Dell Investors everywhere will cry themselves to sleep tonight.

The notion that Dell has started taking strategy advice from a globule would explain a lot with regard to the company's recent woes.

How we long for the days when hard-ass Michael Dell would dismiss HP or Sun with a one-liner. Dell - while not a comic at heart - was the master of the powerful, tasteful put down. He had the revenue and market share gains to back up any barbs.

We wonder what Michael thinks about some candy-ass employees embracing the hippie, Web 2.0 lifestyle and plugging Sun's CEO just because a swollen flash-in-the-pan told them to.

Here's hoping that Dell remembers that selling stuff and not "starting open conversations" got it to the top.

Itanium? We've heard of it

Some more weirdness in the server industry this week came courtesy of Intel and HP.

Intel has a gig planned next Tuesday in San Francisco to unveil both of Montectio's bodacious cores in front of reporters. HP happened to schedule an event for the same day in Palo Alto to show off its "Next Generation Data Center."

As of this morning, HP gave in and moved its event, deciding it might not want to divide reporters between the two gigs. HP's future is more tied to Itanic than Intel's, and we think someone in the marketing department figured that out.

Another bit of proof that HP has some of the more savvy marketeers around has arrived from Down Under. We received this napkin from a server customer in Australia who attended a Sun event. Sun was looking for an event sponsor, and HP actually stepped up with the requisite cash. The end result? HP-powered Sun napkins. "Apparently the Sun customers thought it was great, especially watching the Sun reps running around trying to pick up the napkins all day," writes a source.

Napkin with Sun and HP logos

A chassis to a knife fight

The last bit of server weirdness again comes from Sun, which launched three, new Opteron-based servers today.

Sun spent much of its launch event plugging the Sun Blade 8000 chassis without ever mentioning its x8400 Opteron-based blades by name. We still can't figure out why Sun refuses to tell reporters about the existence of its blades, but there you have it. Sun's server chief John Fowler did admit that two-socket Opteron blades will arrive next year along with UltraSPARC-based blades. No need to hurry. ®

Best practices for enterprise data

More from The Register

next story
Microsoft's Euro cloud darkens: US FEDS can dig into foreign servers
They're not emails, they're business records, says court
Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
And goes to the Genius Bar for support
Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
Auntie remains MYSTIFIED by that weekend BBC iPlayer and website outage
Still doing 'forensics' on the caching layer – Beeb digi wonk
Microsoft says 'weird things' can happen during Windows Server 2003 migrations
Fix coming for bug that makes Kerberos croak when you run two domain controllers
Cisco says network virtualisation won't pay off everywhere
Another sign of strain in the Borg/VMware relationship?
prev story

Whitepapers

7 Elements of Radically Simple OS Migration
Avoid the typical headaches of OS migration during your next project by learning about 7 elements of radically simple OS migration.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Consolidation: The Foundation for IT Business Transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.
Solving today's distributed Big Data backup challenges
Enable IT efficiency and allow a firm to access and reuse corporate information for competitive advantage, ultimately changing business outcomes.
A new approach to endpoint data protection
What is the best way to ensure comprehensive visibility, management, and control of information on both company-owned and employee-owned devices?