Feeds

Apple delays Scandinavian iTunes reaction

August extension

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

Apple has been given more time to defend the Digital Rights Management (DRM) in iTunes, which has fallen foul of Scandinavian regulators. It now has until 1 August to prepare its case. The Norwegian Ombudsman ruled in June that the terms and conditions for iTunes were unlawful and have to be changed. The body gave Apple until 21 June to respond to the ruling, but that deadline has been extended until 1 August, said Norway's Consumer Council.

"ITunes/Apple has been given an extension until 1 August," said Torgeir Waterhouse, senior advisor at the Consumer Council of Norway, the body that took the iTunes case. "We at the Consumer Council had hoped they would reply before the 21 June."

Ombudsmen in Sweden and Denmark are also looking into the issue and are likely to follow Norway's judgment. The Danish authorities are investigating even though they have received no formal complaint. Norwegian, Danish and Swedish law tends to be similar and legal authorities tend to act together in such cases.

The Norwegian Ombudsman ruled in June that the iTunes DRM, which ensures that only home computers and Apple's iPods can play iTunes songs, was illegal and gave the company until 21 June to respond.

Apple has already run into difficulty in France, where a recent copyright law was passed which all but outlawed the iTunes DRM. A last minute amendment created a loophole that will allow Apple to continue with the same technology only with the consent of song copyright holders.

The Ombudsman, whose decisions have the force of a court ruling, had also made other orders which apply immediately and to which Apple will not have the chance to respond. Apple has the right to appeal to the Norwegian courts system on any of the orders.

The other rulings centred on Apple's terms and conditions for the iTunes service. The terms had specified English law as the basis for the agreement and disclaimed liability for any damage done by the service to a user's computer.

The Ombudsman said these terms were unacceptable, that Norwegian law had to apply and that Apple could not discharge its computer-damage liability. Those judgments came into effect immediately.

Copyright © 2006, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Kaspersky backpedals on 'done nothing wrong, nothing to fear' blather
Founder (and internet passport fan) now says privacy is precious
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Facebook, Google and Instagram 'worse than drugs' says Miley Cyrus
Italian boffins agree with popette's theory that haters are the real wrecking balls
Sit tight, fanbois. Apple's '$400' wearable release slips into early 2015
Sources: time to put in plenty of clock-watching for' iWatch
Facebook to let stalkers unearth buried posts with mobe search
Prepare to HAUNT your pal's back catalogue
Ex-IBM CEO John Akers dies at 79
An era disrupted by the advent of the PC
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.