Feeds

IBM to create 300 new Dublin jobs

Celebrates anniversary with expanded ops

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

IBM has announced it is to create 300 new jobs in Dublin within the next three years, bringing the number of staff it employs in Ireland to around 3,500.

The US computer giant, which is this year celebrating 50 years in Ireland, is to invest €46 million in expanding its software development operations. It will also be using the money to launch a business incubation centre, and invest in its supply chain in Dublin.

It will be recruiting mainly graduate and doctorate level engineers to fill the 300 new positions. The new recruits will be concentrating primarily on areas such as innovation in financial services, retail markets and biomedical research.

IBM's Dublin software laboratory will be expanded to create a number of "Centres of Competencies" in Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) and SAP applications. The company will also expand its industry models portfolio with new offerings for the healthcare and financial markets. In addition, a new Centre of Competency in Biomedical Research will be created to develop a clinical trials portal for the medical profession.

Meanwhile, the firm's new business incubation centre aims to combine IBM research, technology, services and consulting expertise with skills and knowledge of local industry partners, developers, universities and government organisations in a bid to identify and advance emerging business opportunities.

The centre will also provide Ireland's research and development community with access to the company's newly-established Technology Collaboration Solutions business unit.

"Today's announcement is an excellent way to mark 50 years of IBM innovation in Ireland," said Michael Daly, country general manager, IBM Ireland. "The investment demonstrates IBM's commitment in Ireland as a key location to help fulfil IBM's global research, development and business strategy."

IBM set up base here in 1956 with just three employees working from the Shelbourne Hotel in Dublin. Since then it has become one of the largest employers in the country and has made a significant contribution to the development of the technology sector here.

In 1980, IBM became the first company to set up a software facility in Ireland - a move that helped establish the nation's reputation as a premier location for software development.

IBM currently employs over 3,200 people in several operations around Dublin, in manufacturing, eProcurement, sales and marketing, software development, consultancy, services and customer support and treasury operations.

Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment Micheal Martin welcomed Thursday's announcement, saying that the further investment by IBM was "extremely important" for Ireland.

"Overall, the investment helps facilitate IBM's ongoing transition to a globally integrated company, drawing upon the right combination of skills and expertise to meet its clients' needs. This is a tremendous achievement for the company's 50th anniversary in Ireland," said Minister Martin.

Copyright © 2006, ENN

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
Mozilla's 'Tiles' ads debut in new Firefox nightlies
You can try turning them off and on again
No, thank you. I will not code for the Caliphate
Some assignments, even the Bongster decline must
Barnes & Noble: Swallow a Samsung Nook tablet, please ... pretty please
Novelslab finally on sale with ($199 - $20) price tag
Banking apps: Handy, can grab all your money... and RIDDLED with coding flaws
Yep, that one place you'd hoped you wouldn't find 'em
TROLL SLAYER Google grabs $1.3 MEEELLION in patent counter-suit
Chocolate Factory hits back at firm for suing customers
Primetime precrime? Minority Report TV series 'being developed'
I have to know. I have to find out what happened to my life
Netflix swallows yet another bitter pill, inks peering deal with TWC
Net neutrality crusader once again pays up for priority access
prev story

Whitepapers

Top 10 endpoint backup mistakes
Avoid the ten endpoint backup mistakes to ensure that your critical corporate data is protected and end user productivity is improved.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Backing up distributed data
Eliminating the redundant use of bandwidth and storage capacity and application consolidation in the modern data center.
The essential guide to IT transformation
ServiceNow discusses three IT transformations that can help CIOs automate IT services to transform IT and the enterprise
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.