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GeCube ships HDCP-compliant graphics cards

HD TV ready

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Graphics card maker GeCube this week announced it as started shipping ATI Radeon X1300- and X16090-based boards with full HDCP support to ensure HDMI-connected HD TVs will display content at the maximum resolution.

Both HV series boards ship with 256MB of GDDR 2graphics memory - they can grab a further 256MB of system memory using ATI's HyperMemory system. The X1300 part has four pixel pipelines, the X1600 has 12.

gecube x1300 hdcp-compliant board

GeCube said both products are fitted with the encryption keys required to validate the link to an HDMI-equipped HD TV using the HDCP (High-bandwidth Digital Copy Protection) scheme. HD content on HD DVD or Blu-ray Discs may be set to require an HDCP-guarded connection to the display. If no such link exists, the player may, at the content provider's whim, output the material at a sub-standard definition resolution.

GeCube's boards both ship with dual-link DVI ports on the back, but the company said it was bundling the products with a DVI-to-HDMI dongle. ®

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