Feeds

Spain adds levy to blank discs

Taxes goods 'likely to be used to copy'

Mobile application security vulnerability report

The Spanish government will add a levy to blank media such as CDs and DVDs to hand over to copyright holders to compensate for the duplication of copyrighted materials.

The move follows the lead of most European countries, which charge a levy on goods likely to be used to copy music or films or other copyrighted works. Though the UK bans all copying, most European countries permit copying for personal use and use the levy as a way to reimburse copyright holders.

Last week, the Spanish Congress voted to place a tax on blank CDs, DVDs and even flash memory sticks, according to Spanish news site Typicallyspanish.com. The move came as part of an overall reform of intellectual property reforms, the site said.

In recognition that many of the products levied will be used for other purposes, the levy is usually extremely small, and it has not commonly spread to items such as hard disks or internet connections, which are commonly used to pirate copyrighted material.

The European Commission warned earlier this month that a spread of such levies into digital goods and services could damage consumers and provoke resentment. The warning came in a consultation document issued by the commission as part of an attempt to change the levies to suit the digital world.

"[In the digital media world] it would no longer be possible to hold only liable the manufacturers or importers of equipment and media," the commission's consultation document said. "The logic of levies would also have to be applied to broadband and infrastructure service providers including telecommunications providers that carry content.

"If this were to happen, levies would proliferate and there would be a serious risk of a backlash against the rights holder community and consumer welfare," it said.

Copyright © 2006, OUT-LAW.com

OUT-LAW.COM is part of international law firm Pinsent Masons.

Boost IT visibility and business value

More from The Register

next story
Report: American tech firms charge Britons a thumping nationality tax
Without representation, too. Time for a Boston (Lincs) Macbook Party?
iPad? More like iFAD: We reveal why Apple fell into IBM's arms
But never fear fanbois, you're still lapping up iPhones, Macs
Apple gets patent for WRIST-PUTER: iTime for a smartwatch
It does everything a smartwatch should do ... but Apple owns it
For Lenovo US, 8-inch Windows tablets are DEAD – long live 8-inch Windows tablets
Reports it's killing off smaller slabs are greatly exaggerated
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Microsoft unsheathes cheap Android-killer: Behold, the Lumia 530
Say it with us: I'm King of the Landfill-ill-ill-ill
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.