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Trend Micro to create over 100 jobs in Cork

Sings praise of Irish workforce

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Security firm Trend Micro has announced it is to double the number of staff employed at its EMEA headquarters in Cork.

The firm, which provides software, hardware and services to the secure content and threat management solutions sector, is to expand its Cork facility, a move it said will bring the number of staff based in its EMEA headquarters to 216.

Trend Micro EMEA vice president sales and operations Anthony O'Mara said the firm currently has an "immediate requirement to fill 35 vacancies, with the remaining positions coming on-stream in the next 12 to 18 months".

The new jobs will be created within existing functions at the centre, but there will also be some new global and EMEA management functions and responsibilities, including a centralised sales team.

Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment Micheal Martin, who officially opened Trend Micro's Cork centre on Monday, expressed his delight at the news, saying it was the second IT jobs boost for Cork in recent weeks. Last week, Netgear announced the creation of 100 new jobs as it made the decision to establish its international headquarters in Cork.

"[Trend Micro] has rapidly developed since its arrival here in 2003 and we are delighted that the Irish-based operation is playing such an important role in a truly global company," Minister Martin said. "The company's ability to secure additional high-tech knowledge dependent activities from its parent company is indicative of the depth, quality and expertise of the Irish workforce."

O'Mara explained that the firm chose Cork for its EMEA headquarters because of the availability of a "highly educated, multi-lingual and motivated workforce".

Founded in 1989 in Taiwan, Trend Micro has been headquartered in Tokyo since 1996. The firm, which employs over 2,900 people worldwide, is quoted on the Tokyo stock exchange and the Nasdaq. Trend Micro's 2005 revenues and profits grew to €624m and €159m respectively.

Copyright © 2006, ENN

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