Feeds

A postcard from JBoss World 2006

The first conference after the sale of JBoss to Red Hat

High performance access to file storage

"A sigh of relief" is how Marc Fleury describes reaction to the purchase of JBoss by Red Hat. And this seems fair enough. As an exit strategy this one lets "JBoss, a division of Red Hat" continue on its way, but with more money and international support ("out of the gates", Red Hat is starting on translating JBoss material into six languages).

A picture of marc Fleaury of JBossMarc did consider an IPO, but that's a lot of work and not exactly risk free these days (he seemed visibly relieved that the Red Hat purchase negotiations were all over and that the money had actually, finally, flowed to where it was going; overnight interest is significant on large sums).

Other companies were interested in purchasing, but it is hard to see any of them leaving JBoss's management (or its "small company passion") alone and, whatever Marc once thought of Red Hat (he did, thank God, make a light-hearted reference to this), it now seems to be a natural home for his company. We shall see, but it I didn't see any incipient cracks forming while talking with Marc and Matthew Szulik (CEO of Red Hat) and at least one JBoss developer said he found his opposite number in Red Hat sympathetic enough.

The new company still isn't that big (1,600 souls, I think) but it has a global reach and channel which Jboss didn't have, and it claims the same "small company passion". And it has some interesting products: I was interested in JBoss Cache, JBoss Groups (reliable multicast, which does the "heavy lifting" for JBoss Cache)and its new SOA/ESB focus. Bela Ban's refactoring approach (he's now lead on JBoss Groups and originally developed JBoss Cache)is interesting too: keeping everything as simple as possible, but no simpler (he also believes that an Open Source strategy deters developers from tinkering with technologies they don't understand, because they can see how JBoss' caching, say, actually works; I hope he's right).

And Mark Proctor, project lead for JBoss Rules, presented a good strategy too - to commoditise a "Turing complete" developer-friendly rules engine while staying away (for the time being) from high-end AI stuff like natural language processing and rules analysis. He also eschews the sort of hype which says every conditional statement is a rule that belongs in the rule engine and that you can then get rid of your developers, leaving the business users to write the rules for themselves (in which case I'd worry about configuration management, testing, QA generally and all the other things professional developers know about).

Rio Hotel in Las VegasAnnounced at JBoss World was JBoss Seam 1.0, which builds on the latest, simplified J2EE standards and brings Web 2.0 and SOA together: "After 15 years we could barely solve the BACK button problem; well, now we've figured that out." Project Lead for Seam is Gavin King (founder of Hibernate and key features include:

  • EJB-based development, everything in Seam is a lightweight, fine-grained EJB 3.0 POJO, everything is an EJB;
  • AJAX-based remoting, an EJB 3.0 session bean can be called directly from a browser client via Ajax, and the complexity of the XMLHttpRequest API, say, is hidden from the JavaScript developer;
  • Declarative state management (eliminating a whole class of bugs associated with manual state management) and support for new kinds of stateful applications;
  • Support for business process management with JBoss jBPM and automated workflow applications;
  • Support for JSR-168 compliant portals (such as JBoss Portal).

Other announcements included its Open Source Enterprise Management Strategy - it is open sourcing its JBoss Operations Network(ON) management agent and providing a lot of certification and other support for managing the Red Hat/JBoss enterprise platform - and a Certified Software as a Service (SaaS) program, to promote interoperability around the JBoss Enterprise Middleware Suite (JEMS).

And, while I'm enjoying JBoss World, I don't much like Las Vegas - of all things French to build a replica of, why choose the Eiffel Tower? I am finding the casinos depressing - everyone looks so miserable and unglamorous, and I've never seen the point in gambling anyway (watching the tables, the chip-flow is definitely one-way - away from the punters). Oh well, I suppose I'm here to work, and information overload is fast approaching.®

High performance access to file storage

More from The Register

next story
Android engineer: We DIDN'T copy Apple OR follow Samsung's orders
Veep testifies for Samsung during Apple patent trial
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Windows 8.1, which you probably haven't upgraded to yet, ALREADY OBSOLETE
Pre-Update versions of new Windows version will no longer support patches
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Windows XP still has 27 per cent market share on its deathbed
Windows 7 making some gains on XP Death Day
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Microsoft TIER SMEAR changes app prices whether devs ask or not
Some go up, some go down, Redmond goes silent
Red Hat to ship RHEL 7 release candidate with a taste of container tech
Grab 'near-final' version of next Enterprise Linux next week
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
HP ArcSight ESM solution helps Finansbank
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Mobile application security study
Download this report to see the alarming realities regarding the sheer number of applications vulnerable to attack, as well as the most common and easily addressable vulnerability errors.