Feeds

Greenies meet to improve climate predictions

Making fundamental research pay

Top three mobile application threats

Research and government groups will meet this week to discuss how they can better collaborate to improve the application of climate change research.

The Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) is holding a conference today and tomorrow with the Met Office and the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasting (ECMWF).

The meeting comes as NERC's seven-year Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Processes and European Climate (COAPEC) programme draws to a close. The £5.5m research programme was set up to investigate how the Atlantic Ocean and the atmosphere affect the European climate. However, NERC says there is a gap between research programmes like this one and the application of their findings.

Better climate forecasts can reduce the risks from droughts, flood, heat waves, and weather-related disruption to transport. Key to producing these better forecasts is better communication between the various research and government groups involved. This should lead to new collaborations which in turn should spur on the research, NERC argues.

One of the goals of this week's meeting is to work out ways to use the results of research like COAPEC to improve the medium and long range weather and climate forecasts government and businesses need to prepare for bad weather. NERC says it is also a valuable opportunity for its scientists to demonstrate the value of fundamental research to government.

In related news, University College London is launching a new Masters degree course in Environmental Systems Engineering. The aim of the course is to produce graduates capable of developing sustainable solutions to complex environmental problems.

Course director Sarah Bell said: "Sustainable development is one of the greatest challenges of our time, and we will provide students with the skills, knowledge and experience needed to meet this challenge now and into the future."

More details on this one here. ®

3 Big data security analytics techniques

More from The Register

next story
KILLER SPONGES menacing California coastline
Surfers are safe, crustaceans less so
Opportunity selfie: Martian winds have given the spunky ol' rover a spring cleaning
Power levels up 70 per cent as the rover keeps on truckin'
Liftoff! SpaceX Falcon 9 lifts Dragon on third resupply mission to ISS
SpaceX snaps smartly into one-second launch window
KILLER ROBOTS, DNA TAMPERING and PEEPING CYBORGS: the future looks bright!
Americans optimistic about technology despite being afraid of EVERYTHING
Discovery time for 200m WONDER MATERIALS shaved from 4 MILLENNIA... to 4 years
Alloy, Alloy: Boffins in speed-classification breakthrough
R.I.P. LADEE: Probe smashes into lunar surface at 3,600mph
Swan dive signs off successful science mission
Elon Musk's LEAKY THRUSTER gas stalls Space Station supply run
Helium seeps from Falcon 9 first stage, delays new legs for NASA robonaut
prev story

Whitepapers

Securing web applications made simple and scalable
In this whitepaper learn how automated security testing can provide a simple and scalable way to protect your web applications.
3 Big data security analytics techniques
Applying these Big Data security analytics techniques can help you make your business safer by detecting attacks early, before significant damage is done.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.