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Artist's impressions from BenQ-Siemens

We see through the latest BenQ-Siemens phones

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Mobile phones are wonderful things but blimey you can get sick and tired of looking at reams of photos all showing little screens and keyboards. So we say God Bless BenQ-Siemens and all who sale in her for making life more interesting by releasing a series of design sketches of three of its latest phones.

We kick off with the EF81 which is available in Titanium Silver or, possibly, 2B pencil. It’s a flip design and is Tri-band with dimensions of 94x51x15.9mm with a weight of 110g. There’s 64MB of internal storage and a micro-SD slot which supports a card up to 1GB. The main screen is 2.2inches across the diagonal with a resolution of 240x320 pixels. The secondary caller ID screen is 1.3inches and 120x160 pixels. You get a 2.0Megapixel camera with 5x digital zoom. Although the EF81 supports MPEG4, Real video, MP3 and AAC it doesn’t have an FM radio, which seems like an oversight. On the connection front you get WAP, GSM, GPRS, USB and Bluetooth. The 950mAh battery has a rated stand-by life of 300 hours on GSM with 4.5 hours of talk time.

BenQ Siemens EF81 design sketch

The EL71 phone has a sliding tray keyboard and measures a tiny 90x46.3x16.5mm with a similarly Lilliputian weight of 94g. Mind you, BenQ-Siemens has achieved these figures at least in part by specifying a 570mAh battery which delivers a stand-by time of ‘less than 300 hours’ and a talk time of ‘less than 5 hours.’ Well yes, no doubt, but how much less we wonder? The colour is described as Quartz Anthracite but to our eye it looks silver. Other than that, it’s a Tri-band model with a 2inch screen (resolution of 240x320 pixels), Bluetooth and a 1.3Megapixel camera. In other words a fairly basic phone but a damned smart one.

BenQ Siemens EL71 design sketch

The third phone is the candy bar S68 which measures 107x44x13.2mm and weighs in at 78.5g, which is positively feather-weight. The feature list is quite short as there is no camera and the screen has a low resolution of 132x176 pixels, however you get the essentials of WAP, GPRS, USB and Bluetooth. The Multimedia features are, in full, ‘Media player application preinstalled’.®

BenQ Siemens S68 design sketch

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