Feeds

The state of POJO play

'Plain Old Java' back in fashion

The Power of One Brief: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

Book review Few could deny that one of the biggest drivers of change in the Java world recently has been the complexity of "enterprise Java".

The complexities of EJB 2.x, with forests of XML configuration files, boiler plate script, the slow edit-compile-debug cycle forced by having to deploy to a server, the reliance on procedural code...

The list of problems is well known, and has been chronicled frequently and vociferously by any number of well-known Java developers.

However, a positive spin-off has been an explosion of interest and activity in what have been termed "rebel J2EE" frameworks. Spring, Hibernate, JDO and countless other frameworks have been developed to tackle some of the deficiencies in the Java enterprise arena. And, just as significantly there's also been a resurgence of interest in what are (very) loosely known as scripting languages, particularly Ruby. Similarly, interest in Ajax is extremely high in the Java community for some of the same reasons.

In POJOs in Action, Chris Richardson reprises all of these developments and shows how these new frameworks solve particular problems. POJOs (Plain Old Java Objects) is a term that was popularised by Martin Fowler (he of Refactoring fame), Rebbecca Parsons and Josh MacKenzie as a way of putting a fancy name on the practice of using regular Java objects rather than encapsulating business logic in Enterprise JavaBeans.

Part one of the book starts with a quick history lesson, outlines the major problems that enterprise applications have to solve (object relational mapping, data access, transactions, concurrency etc), and then looks at how these have been addressed using EJB 2.x. The POJO based alternatives are briefly outlined, along with a preview of EJB 3.0, which is considered to be a step in the right direction in that it is much more POJO-centric than its predecessor.

Part two goes into much more detail, and presents a series of design patterns for tackling things like object relational mapping, the encapsulation of business logic, and so on. Hibernate and JDO are used extensively, and a number of complex and realistic examples are developed to illustrate how to use them effectively.

While the book is heavy with source code, the writing goes into detail of the design process so that it's clear what the solutions are trying to do and why. Discussion of the pros and cons of Hibernate vs JDO vs EJB 3.0 is not neglected.

On the database transaction side of things there's discussion of JDBC and how iBatis and Spring can be used to implement the transaction script pattern in part three of the book. This section also looks in more detail at EJB 3.0 and shows how POJOs can be used with this to win back some of the benefits of "regular" Java development.

On the whole, the book is well written and provides solid technical advice. Richardson is a confident author, and he's well known within the Java enterprise community. No book on enterprise Java is easy reading, but for anyone seriously wanting to catch up with the current state of play this provides both an excellent over-view and some detailed hands-on examples.

POJOs In Action

Verdict: Excellent overview of enterprise Java

Author: Chris Richardson

Publisher: Manning Publications

ISBN: 1932394583

Media: Book

List Price: £31.99

Reg price: £25.59 (saving 20 per cent)

Buy this book at Cash 'n' Carrion.

Securing Web Applications Made Simple and Scalable

More from The Register

next story
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
HIDDEN packet sniffer spy tech in MILLIONS of iPhones, iPads – expert
Don't panic though – Apple's backdoor is not wide open to all, guru tells us
NO MORE ALL CAPS and other pleasures of Visual Studio 14
Unpicking a packed preview that breaks down ASP.NET
Captain Kirk sets phaser to SLAUGHTER after trying new Facebook app
William Shatner less-than-impressed by Zuck's celebrity-only app
Microsoft takes on Chromebook with low-cost Windows laptops
Redmond's chief salesman: We're taking 'hard' decisions
Cheer up, Nokia fans. It can start making mobes again in 18 months
The real winner of the Nokia sale is *drumroll* ... Nokia
Mozilla fixes CRITICAL security holes in Firefox, urges v31 upgrade
Misc memory hazards 'could be exploited' - and guess what, one's a Javascript vuln
EU dons gloves, pokes Google's deals with Android mobe makers
El Reg cops a squint at investigatory letters
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.