Feeds

RFID chips for migrant workers in the US?

But tracking tech 'not ready for prime time'

Security for virtualized datacentres

VeriChip chairman Scott Silverman's appearance on American TV this week has raised fears of the introduction of RFID technology.

According to RNIF, he "bandied about the idea of chipping foreigners on national television Tuesday".

RINF said Silverman appeared to be emboldened by the Bush Administration call to know "who is in our country and why they are here". He told Fox & Friends that the VeriChip could be used to register guest workers, verify their identities as they cross the border, and "be used for enforcement purposes at the employer level". He added: "We have talked to many people in Washington about using it..."

There's a long journey between having a lobbyist wittering on Fox & Friends, and any policy decision, even if former Homeland Security boss Tommy Thompson sits on the Verichip board - but the story shows the level of anxiety about radio frequency ID chips in society generally.

In Europe, according to the Financial Times, "the EU's information society commissioner, Viviane Reding, wants a debate about the security and privacy issues surrounding RFID".

That's a preparation for an e-privacy review this year. But the real story, suggests the FT, is the discovery that RFID really isn't ready for prime time.

According to IDC, many RFID plans have been pushed back - but not because of privacy fears. Privacy issues will perhaps become an issue, and the FT reports that several companies working on the technology are now starting to build safeguards into the system - but right now, the problem is simply that RFID often doesn't work, and costs too much.

But implants are likely to come back. Colombian president Alvaro Uribe has been saying that he's in favour of chipping migrant workers before giving them entry visas to the US. In the UK, prisoners allowed out of jail with radio tags are simply cutting them off their ankles; perhaps it's just a matter of weeks before surgical implants are proposed instead.

American Senator Arlen Specter recently pooh-poohed the idea. RINF noted that his objection was practical, not liberty based; he thinks people will simply dig the chips out from under their skin. "If something were developed that would be assured of working, have no doubt that a fine American such as Arlen Specter would support it," said the RINF columnist.

Copyright © Newswireless.net

Business security measures using SSL

More from The Register

next story
JINGS! Microsoft Bing called Scots indyref RIGHT!
Redmond sporran metrics get one in the ten ring
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
Murdoch to Europe: Inflict MORE PAIN on Google, please
'Platform for piracy' must be punished, or it'll kill us in FIVE YEARS
Phones 4u website DIES as wounded mobe retailer struggles to stay above water
Founder blames 'ruthless network partners' for implosion
Found inside ISIS terror chap's laptop: CELINE DION tunes
REPORT: Stash of terrorist material found in Syria Dell box
OECD lashes out at tax avoiding globocorps' location-flipping antics
You hear that, Amazon, Google, Microsoft et al?
Show us your Five-Eyes SECRETS says Privacy International
Refusal to disclose GCHQ canteen menus and prices triggers Euro Human Rights Court action
prev story

Whitepapers

Providing a secure and efficient Helpdesk
A single remote control platform for user support is be key to providing an efficient helpdesk. Retain full control over the way in which screen and keystroke data is transmitted.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet
Explores the current state of website security and the contributions Symantec is making to help organizations protect critical data and build trust with customers.