Feeds

Orange confirms 'free' broadband giveaway

That'll be £30 please

Business security measures using SSL

Orange has confirmed it will give "free" broadband to its mobile phone subscribers, ending weeks of hype and speculation.

The France Telecom-owned cellco's offer is part of a massive rebranding exercise that sees Wanadoo tossed to one side and the ISP business renamed Orange.

Or, as the firm puts it: "Orange today achieves a historic milestone in UK communications, uniting mobile, fixed-line and broadband under one brand for both consumers and businesses, offering a one-stop-shop solution that will radically simplify how we communicate."

The headline grabbing part of this converged comms provider is the offer of "free broadband" for customers who spend at least £30 a month on an Orange mobile contract. While there is no connection fee, customers still need to shell out around a tenner a month for line rental. There's also a 2 gig a month cap for the service and punters are tied into an 18 month contract.

However, the offer does come complete with a wireless router and Orange's rebranded VoIP package. For an extra £6 a month, customers can sign up to the new Orange Anytime package which gives them free calls to UK landlines.

The new package is available from tomorrow, 1 June, the day the Wanadoo brand is being resprayed Orange.

Orange chief exec Sanjiv Ahuja said: "We're pioneering a new future in telecommunications as we become the only company in the UK to combine broadband, fixedline and mobile communications simply, efficiently and seamlessly under a single brand. One brand, under one roof that speaks with one voice about total communications."

Six weeks ago, The Carphone Warehouse released details of its "free broadband forever" product - a bundled broadband and phone service that is half the price of its nearest rival.

To take up the offer, customers must subscribe to Carphone's TalkTalk fixed line phone service. For £9.99 a month, punters get unlimited local and national landline calls, unlimited international landline calls to 28 countries and up to 8 meg broadband access.

In addition to the monthly fee, customers are also faced with paying a monthly line rental charge of £11.00. The total cost of line rental, calls and broadband is £20.99 per month. ®

Security and trust: The backbone of doing business over the internet

More from The Register

next story
Brit telcos warn Scots that voting Yes could lead to HEFTY bills
BT and Co: Independence vote likely to mean 'increased costs'
Phones 4u slips into administration after EE cuts ties with Brit mobe retailer
More than 5,500 jobs could be axed if rescue mission fails
ISPs' post-net-neutrality world is built on 'bribes' says Tim Berners-Lee
Father of the worldwide web is extremely peeved over pay-per-packet-type plans
New 'Cosmos' browser surfs the net by TXT alone
No data plan? No WiFi? No worries ... except sluggish download speed
Radio hams can encrypt, in emergencies, says Ofcom
Consultation promises new spectrum and hints at relaxed licence conditions
Turnbull: NBN won't turn your town into Silicon Valley
'People have been brainwashed to believe that their world will be changed forever if they get FTTP'
Google+ GOING, GOING ... ? Newbie Gmailers no longer forced into mandatory ID slurp
Mountain View distances itself from lame 'network thingy'
Blockbuster book lays out the first 20 years of the Smartphone Wars
Symbian's David Wood bares all. Not for the faint hearted
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.