Feeds

Internet's first ever global forum outlines plans

Athens meeting open to one and all

Intelligent flash storage arrays

The blueprint for the internet's first ever global forum to be held in Athens this October has been released.

Following a meeting of 48 net luminaries from government, industry and civil society in Geneva this week, the format of the first four day meeting of the Internet Governance Forum (IGF) has been decided. The forum will consist of four general sessions, each covering a main topic. Those topics will be (in order): openness, security, diversity and access.

The first day will kick off with an opening ceremony, and outline of the forum's approach. The second and third days will see each topic given three hours in the main hall. The plan is to offer a mix of presentations as well as panel and floor discussions.

Each session will be web-cast and transcribed in real-time in six different languages, and those on the net will be able to interact through both instant messaging and blog posts - some of which will be compiled and reported on at a "recap and review" session at the end of each session.

Everything will be summed up on the final day with a review, an open mic session, and closing ceremony.

The hope is that the IGF will be the global talking point for issues thrown up by the internet, and a place where the world's experts in different topics can congregate and thrash out ideas and solutions. Widely expected to get the most attention is spam and cybersecurity, although the developing nations are very keen to press the cost and availability of internet access in poorer countries.

Other topics are more controversial, so issues such as the US government's current control of the internet, free speech, and open source software have been pulled from the main agenda and will instead take place in workshops elsewhere during the meeting.

The expected location for the first IGF is the luxury resort of Astir Palace, in Athens, though the annual meeting will take place in a different country every year. This year's forum runs from 30 October to 2 November.

Contributions to the forum are welcomed up to the deadline of 15 July, so if you have a solution for a pressing internet problem and you want to draw the world's attention to it, now is your chance.

More information about the IGF can be found at its website. The Greek government has set up a specific IGF Athens website here. ®

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

More from The Register

next story
Facebook pays INFINITELY MORE UK corp tax than in 2012
Thanks for the £3k, Zuck. Doh! you're IN CREDIT. Guess not
Big Content outs piracy hotbeds: São Paulo, Beijing ... TORONTO?
MPAA calls Canadians a bunch of bootlegging movie thieves
Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
YARR! Pirates walk the plank: DMCA magnets sink in Google results
Spaffing copyrighted stuff over the web? No search ranking for you
Just don't blame Bono! Apple iTunes music sales PLUMMET
Cupertino revenue hit by cheapo downloads, says report
Hungary's internet tax cannot be allowed to set a precedent, says EC
More protests planned against giga-tariff for Tuesday evening
US court SHUTS DOWN 'scammers posing as Microsoft, Facebook support staff'
Netizens allegedly duped into paying for bogus tech advice
prev story

Whitepapers

Cloud and hybrid-cloud data protection for VMware
Learn how quick and easy it is to configure backups and perform restores for VMware environments.
Getting started with customer-focused identity management
Learn why identity is a fundamental requirement to digital growth, and how without it there is no way to identify and engage customers in a meaningful way.
Reg Reader Research: SaaS based Email and Office Productivity Tools
Read this Reg reader report which provides advice and guidance for SMBs towards the use of SaaS based email and Office productivity tools.
Intelligent flash storage arrays
Tegile Intelligent Storage Arrays with IntelliFlash helps IT boost storage utilization and effciency while delivering unmatched storage savings and performance.
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.