Feeds

A Java - .NET 'welding' course

How to join the two leading environments

  • alert
  • submit to reddit

3 Big data security analytics techniques

Book review Like it or not, (and there are plenty of zealots who don't), the Java and .NET worlds have to learn to live with one another nicely. In practice this means that applications have to be able to cross platform boundaries easily - no more hiding behind proprietary interfaces, no more trying to own the entire software stack, and no more pretending that other platforms don't exist. All of which is helping to drive the move towards web services and service oriented architectures (SOA).

The snappily entitled Java EE and .NET Interoperability represents the Sun Microsystems view of what it means for Java and .NET to live in peaceful and productive coexistence. Note that Java EE is the platform formerly known as J2EE, which means this is a book that's principally focused on heavyweight enterprise architectures rather than the less daunting but still contested desktop view of the software world.

The authors of the book, a trio of Sun techies and Laurence Moroney from integration tools specialists Mainsoft, make a good stab at presenting a fairly neutral view of interoperability. They provide introductions to Java EE and to .NET, for example, so those coming from either platform can work out what's what. They discuss different interoperability scenarios with Java or .NET at the client and server end. They talk synchronous and asynchronous integration. Design patterns, best practices, web service implementation differences (because standards aren't, well, standard...).

In short, there's plenty of architectural meat. And, for those who can't cope without it, there's plenty of sample source code (both in Java and C#), so the book gets down and dirty rather than staying up in the clouds.

However, the book suffers from that strange mangling of the English language that seems to afflict people when they write about enterprise architectures. It's not just the acronyms, it's the weird way words are strung together without apparent regard for the reader. And there seems to be a rule that the words web, service, abstraction and interoperation have to be included in every paragraph. This tendency is exacerbated by a degree of repetition. Perhaps it's down to the multiple authors, but at times it felt as though every chapter introduced web services as though for the first time. Whatever else this is, it's not a book one would read for pleasure (not that I'm suggesting that reading about enterprise application architectures is something that one would do for the fun of it).

Quibbles about the language aside, the book does provide solid content. It covers a wide range of integration solutions, providing both implementation guidance and best practice information, particularly with regards to the design patterns that maximise decoupling between layers of an application that sit on different platforms.

Of course the platform neutrality only goes so far, and there's a final chapter on porting applications from .NET to Java. A chapter on the reverse process is notably absent, but then again Microsoft has ensured that there's plenty of Java to .NET migration information available.®

Java EE and .NET Interoperability

Java EE and .NET Vulnerability

Verdict: Essential reading for those that need it.

Author: Marina Fisher, Ray Lai, Sonu Sharma and Laurence Moroney

Publisher: Prentice Hall

ISBN: 0131472232

Media: Book

List Price: £35.99

Reg price: £28.79

Top three mobile application threats

More from The Register

next story
This time it's 'Personal': new Office 365 sub covers just two devices
Redmond also brings Office into Google's back yard
Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
Microsoft lobs pre-release Windows Phone 8.1 at devs who dare
App makers can load it before anyone else, but if they do they're stuck with it
Oh no, Joe: WinPhone users already griping over 8.1 mega-update
Hang on. Which bit of Developer Preview don't you understand?
Half of Twitter's 'active users' are SILENT STALKERS
Nearly 50% have NEVER tweeted a word
Internet-of-stuff startup dumps NoSQL for ... SQL?
NoSQL taste great at first but lacks proper nutrients, says startup cloud whiz
Batten down the hatches, Ubuntu 14.04 LTS due in TWO DAYS
Admins dab straining server brows in advance of Trusty Tahr's long-term support landing
IRS boss on XP migration: 'Classic fix the airplane while you're flying it attempt'
Plus: Condoleezza Rice at Dropbox 'maybe she can find ... weapons of mass destruction'
Ditch the sync, paddle in the Streem: Upstart offers syncless sharing
Upload, delete and carry on sharing afterwards?
prev story

Whitepapers

Top three mobile application threats
Learn about three of the top mobile application security threats facing businesses today and recommendations on how to mitigate the risk.
Combat fraud and increase customer satisfaction
Based on their experience using HP ArcSight Enterprise Security Manager for IT security operations, Finansbank moved to HP ArcSight ESM for fraud management.
The benefits of software based PBX
Why you should break free from your proprietary PBX and how to leverage your existing server hardware.
Five 3D headsets to be won!
We were so impressed by the Durovis Dive headset we’ve asked the company to give some away to Reg readers.
SANS - Survey on application security programs
In this whitepaper learn about the state of application security programs and practices of 488 surveyed respondents, and discover how mature and effective these programs are.