Feeds

Scottish nationalists on privacy rap

Connery calls over the line

Security for virtualized datacentres

The Information Commissioner has given the Scottish National Party (SNP) an official reprimand for using Sir Sean Connery to violate the privacy of its constituents with a plea for their votes in the 2005 general election.

The SNP had made unsolicited telephone marketing calls with a message recorded by celebrity nationalist Sir Sean Connery. It had offended the Privacy and Electronic Communications Regulations (2003) by making wholly automated marketing calls.

It offended them further when Sir Sean's pleas for votes were made through the telephones of people who had registered with the Telephone Preference Service, a log that forbids telephone marketers from going anywhere near them.

This is not the first time Sir Sean's name has been linked to nuisance marketing in the name of the SNP. Last time it was spam-a-friend emails.

The SNP had appealed against the Information Commissioner's attempt to give it an Enforcement Notice, an official slap on the wrist. But the appeal was rejected by the Information Tribunal in Edinburgh last Wednesday, a decision that was published yesterday, and has been followed up with a smart rebuke. It appeared the SNP had tried to wriggle out of it by claiming a political party should have some sort of special privilege to trespass on people's privacy.

Deputy information commissioner Phil Jones said in a statement the decision had helped ensure political parties complied with the regulations.

"If [the SNP's] view that promotional calls by political parties are not direct marketing calls had been upheld, then neither they, nor any other political party, would have to take account of the rules on unsolicited marketing," he said.

Unscrupulous methods had allowed the SNP to bend the ear of more voters than it had ever managed by not sticking to the rules of decent conduct laid out by privacy laws. A spokeswoman said the party would not be seeking a further appeal.

Bruce Crawford MSP said in a statement how disappointed he was that the IC prevented political parties from using the "cost effective" and "quick" means to contact potential voters.

The party had received just four complaints "out of half a million calls", he said, adding that he had asked the IC in writing how it would see that the SNP's political rivals would keep within the regulations as well.

It is now a criminal offence for the SNP to break the enforcement notice. If it cannot make do without making unwanted telephone calls, it could always get around the system in the same way other unscrupulous marketers do, by having Sir Sean's recorded message dial in from some offshore haven.

The decision is expected to copied on the Information Tribunal's website soon. ®

Beginner's guide to SSL certificates

More from The Register

next story
Bono apologises for iTunes album dump
Megalomania, generosity and FEAR of irrelevance drove group to Apple deal
Facebook, Apple: LADIES! Why not FREEZE your EGGS? It's on the company!
No biological clockwatching when you work in Silicon Valley
Doctor Who's Flatline: Cool monsters, yes, but utterly limp subplots
We know what the Doctor does, stop going on about it already
Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
'Cowardly, venomous trolls' threatened with TWO-YEAR sentences for menacing posts
UK government: 'Taking a stand against a baying cyber-mob'
Arab States make play for greater government control of the internet
Nerds told to get lost in last-minute power grab bid at UN meeting
Zippy one-liners, broken promises: Doctor Who on the Orient Express
Series finally hits stride, but Clara's U-turn is baffling
Don't bother telling people if you lose their data, say Euro bods
You read that right – with the proviso that it's encrypted
prev story

Whitepapers

Forging a new future with identity relationship management
Learn about ForgeRock's next generation IRM platform and how it is designed to empower CEOS's and enterprises to engage with consumers.
Win a year’s supply of chocolate
There is no techie angle to this competition so we're not going to pretend there is, but everyone loves chocolate so who cares.
Why cloud backup?
Combining the latest advancements in disk-based backup with secure, integrated, cloud technologies offer organizations fast and assured recovery of their critical enterprise data.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
Saudi Petroleum chooses Tegile storage solution
A storage solution that addresses company growth and performance for business-critical applications of caseware archive and search along with other key operational systems.