Feeds

Lean, mean Intel hands out race cars to the press

Cutting costs one gewgaw at a time

Business security measures using SSL

Intel claims to be all about fat trimming these days. So why the heck is it sending race cars to reporters?

Hacks around the globe this week received model race cars from Intel's new public relations agency Burson-Marsteller. BM - as the company bravely refers to itself - won the lucrative Intel contract, becoming the first outside agency to handle US PR business for the chip maker that we can remember. Up until the shift, Intel had been one of the few giants to do just about all of its US public relations inhouse.

Now reporters are receiving trinkets in the mail from an agency. The race cars are meant to celebrate Intel's launch today of new server processors. Complementing the cars and chips, Intel - or rather we imagine BM - has put up the Start Your Engines website.

The website isn't a horrible idea other than it implying Intel has not had its engines turned on until today. PR agencies tend to avoid such revealing admissions, but, in this case, Intel/BM had no choice. Everyone knows Intel has fallen behind AMD on the server processor front, and the new chips from Intel are meant to solve that problem.

Photo of Intel's toy car

Intel's BM moment with business card shown for perspective

Of course, the benchmark on the Intel site, which shows the new Dempsey processor being a real dog when compared to the still yet to be released Woodcrest chip, doesn't look all that fantastic.

These types of marketing efforts - the cars and the questionable website - don't seem to fit in well with Intel's current pledge to eliminate the unnecessary. CEO Paul Otellini last month vowed to reorganize the company in the hopes of improving Intel's flagging financial and product performance. Intel will become "lean, more agile and more efficient" and "no stone will remain unturned or unlooked at", Otellini said.

And here we have BM billing Intel god knows how much to send out toy cars to reporters. (Everyone knows you're supposed to send food. Send food!)

A toy car, of course, is small fry in the big scheme of things. But, when we first caught wind of Intel's agency idea, we thought it a bad move, and this confirms our suspicions. Intel's PR team was famous for its lean, mean operations and smart staff. It was a model for all other large companies.

We can't see how paying for toy cars fits into Intel's past or future plans. The inhouse team certainly never bothered with such baubles. ®

Website security in corporate America

More from The Register

next story
Oi, London thief. We KNOW what you're doing - our PRECRIME system warned us
Aye, shipmate, it be just like that Minority Report
WRISTJOB LOVE BONANZA: justWatch sex app promises blind date hookups
Mankind shuffles into the future, five fingers at a time
Apple's Mr Havisham: Tim Cook says dead Steve Jobs' office has remained untouched
'I literally think about him every day' says biz baron's old friend
Cops apologise for leaving EXPLOSIVES in suitcase at airport
'Canine training exercise' SNAFU sees woman take home booming baggage
Every billionaire needs a PANZER TANK, right? STOP THERE, Paul Allen
Angry Microsoftie hauls auctioneers to court over stalled Pzkw. IV 'deal'
Flaming drone batteries ground commercial flight before takeoff
Passenger had Something To Declare, instead fiddled while plane burned
prev story

Whitepapers

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops
Balancing user privacy and privileged access, in accordance with compliance frameworks and legislation. Evaluating any potential remote control choice.
WIN a very cool portable ZX Spectrum
Win a one-off portable Spectrum built by legendary hardware hacker Ben Heck
Storage capacity and performance optimization at Mizuno USA
Mizuno USA turn to Tegile storage technology to solve both their SAN and backup issues.
High Performance for All
While HPC is not new, it has traditionally been seen as a specialist area – is it now geared up to meet more mainstream requirements?
The next step in data security
With recent increased privacy concerns and computers becoming more powerful, the chance of hackers being able to crack smaller-sized RSA keys increases.