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Nintendo DS Lite UK debut detailed

iPod-like black and white models on offer

Internet Security Threat Report 2014

Nintendo will release the DS Lite in the UK on 23 June, the videogames pioneer said today. The redesigned handheld console will set British buyers back £100. It will cost €150 (£102) in continental Europe, the company added.

Taking a lead from Apple's iPod, Nintendo said the DS Lite will be available at launch in two colours: glossy black and shiny white.

The company described the DS Lite as a "premium" product which will be offered alongside the original version. With the current model also retailing for around £100 at the moment, it seems hard the justify the 'premium' tag if Nintendo isn't anticipating a DS price cut or limited availability of the DS Lite.

The new model is lighter and smaller than its predecessor and features an improved display. It plays all existing DS games which, by the DS Lite's launch, will have been joined by Dr Kawashima’s Brain Training: How Old Is Your Brain? and Nintendogs Dalmatian and Friends Edition.

New Super Mario Bros. follows on 30 June, with Electroplankton and Big Brain Academy coming on 7 July, Nintendo said. ®

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