Feeds

Govt messenger sacked for Kiwi LLU plan leak

An 'abuse of trust'

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup

A messenger working in the Prime Minister's office in New Zealand has been sacked for leaking details of Government plans to shake-up the country's broadband industry.

Following an investigation, the State Services Commissioner found that messenger Michael Ryan had passed a cabinet document to his friend, and Telecom employee, Peter Garty.

Although Garty was told that the document detailing a massive overhaul of New Zealand's telecoms industry was for "his eyes only", the Telecom employee made a copy before returning the papers to his friend.

Once Garty realised the significance of what he'd been handed, he took the document to his bosses within Telecom to check its authenticity.

Once it became clear that details of the plans had been leaked, the government was forced to publish details of its proposals early - leading to a probe to find the source of the leak.

Publishing his report, State Services Commissioner Mark Prebble said Ryan had "acted alone".

"He took a paper, which it was his job to handle, and abused the trust given to him by passing it to someone who ought not to have been given it. I consider Mr Ryan's actions to be disgraceful.

"The Telecom employee, having received the paper, was compromised and felt obliged to take the paper to Telecom's legal advisors. Telecom, and the employee, were passive recipients of the paper. They neither encouraged Mr Ryan to provide it, nor was he offered or given any reward for providing it. Mr Ryan had provided no previous information on any earlier occasion to Telecom."

Giving evidence to the enquiry, Ryan explained: "It was because Peter and I were such close friends that I gave the document to him. I would not have done that if we were not close friends. I had given it to Peter for his interest, not to benefit him, me, or Telecom.

"I was completely shocked when I read about these matters in the newspaper, I never expected them to surface. I regret very much what I did and realise now how foolish I have been, regardless of the publicity.

"I would like to make it clear that I received no benefit from what I did, financial or in any other sense. My motive was not to damage the government. I have no desire to cause the government or my department any harm whatsoever. It was also not my desire to give Telecom any advantage," he said.

Ryan has now been dismissed and the case is to be handed to police to see whether any further action needs to be taken. ®

Secure remote control for conventional and virtual desktops

More from The Register

next story
6 Obvious Reasons Why Facebook Will Ban This Article (Thank God)
Clampdown on clickbait ... and El Reg is OK with this
So, Apple won't sell cheap kit? Prepare the iOS garden wall WRECKING BALL
It can throw the low cost race if it looks to the cloud
EE fails to apologise for HUGE T-Mobile outage that hit Brits on Friday
Customer: 'Please change your name to occasionally somewhere'
Time Warner Cable customers SQUEAL as US network goes offline
A rude awakening: North Americans greeted with outage drama
We need less U.S. in our WWW – Euro digital chief Steelie Neelie
EC moves to shift status quo at Internet Governance Forum
BT customers face broadband and landline price hikes
Poor punters won't be affected, telecoms giant claims
prev story

Whitepapers

Endpoint data privacy in the cloud is easier than you think
Innovations in encryption and storage resolve issues of data privacy and key requirements for companies to look for in a solution.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Advanced data protection for your virtualized environments
Find a natural fit for optimizing protection for the often resource-constrained data protection process found in virtual environments.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.