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MS tries to rain on PS3 parade with $200 Wii forecast

Exec predicts cut-price Nintendo box

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Microsoft has claimed Nintendo's Wii console will cost $200 when its ships. Well, sort of. In a dig at Sony, Microsoft VP Peter Moore said consumers will be able to buy an Xbox 360 and a Wii for the price of a $599 PlayStation 3, according to Reuters.

Since an Xbox 360 costs around $399, that leaves just $200 for the Nintendo machine. Nintendo has said in the past that the Wii won't sport the very latest technology - it's pitching the product at much at less-demanding casual gamers as hardcore players - so it's entirely possible the company will pitch the price low.

"Tell me why you would buy a $600 PS3?" Moore said in an interview. "People are going to buy two [consoles]. They're going to buy an Xbox and they're going to buy a Wii... for the price of one PS3."

Moore added: "People will always gravitate toward a competitively priced product [which] I believe Wii will be."

Wii will launch in Q4, Nintendo said this week. The company has yet to say how much the machine, formerly known by its codename, 'Revolution', will cost. ®

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