Feeds

Keeping management up to speed with IT

If you don't, the vendors will

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications

From time to time, reports emerge suggesting that senior business people, such as the financial director (FD), are becoming more IT savvy and more involved in IT decision making.

True though this might be, it's important not to get carried away with what it means in practice. Are we seriously expecting FDs to be grilling vendors on the capabilities of their systems management software, or what exactly the vendor means by phrases such as "straightforward upgrade path", "easy to integrate", "all based on open standards", etc? While it might be a sales rep's dream to drive business through purely non-technical decision makers who don't have the knowledge and experience to ask the awkward questions, it's probably not in the best interests of the organisation for this to happen.

Clearly, however, FDs and other executives are involved in prioritising spend and approving budgets and business cases in line with business requirements and objectives. This is something they do across all parts of the business as they juggle the allocation of funds between investment in buildings, plant and machinery, marketing, sales, R&D, and so on, as well as IT. If someone like an FD is doing their job well, they will therefore learn enough about all of these areas so they can converse effectively with the specialists in each department, participate productively in strategy discussions, and make better sense of the plans and proposals that are put to them for review and sign-off.

In an ideal world in which business and IT activities are well aligned, executives should therefore be tuned in to the IT strategy at a high level, with the specialists in the IT department taking care of the details of IT service delivery.

Sometimes, though, it doesn't all quite hang together in the way it should, and there is a danger that IT vendors who engage business executives directly can unduly influence an organisation's IT strategy in line with their own agenda. While FDs generally don't have the time, inclination, or level of knowledge to get involved in the specifics of technical product evaluation and selection, vendor sales people often beat a path to their door and pitch to them directly anyway.

The danger then is that they are delivered "business oriented" visions, which are very compelling, but fail to address real world practicalities and considerations. It's then that we can end up hearing statements such as: "I think we should phase out all of our unix servers and replace them with Windows so we can save money and take advantage of Microsoft's flexible and agile architecture", or questions like "What are our plans to build an Enterprise grid?"

As IT vendors, the big ones especially, are increasingly targeting business executives with their sales and marketing activities, it is becoming more important than ever that the internal IT department has the boardroom beat well covered. There is a lot that goes on in the IT department that business executives don't need or want to know about, but when vendors are hitting them with business spins on the latest infrastructure and architecture concepts and buzz words, it is easy for misunderstandings and disjoints to arise.

The ability for internal IT staff to effectively articulate the same concepts and ideas - utility computing, grid computing, service oriented architecture, software as a service, etc - to the business management audience in the context of the organisation's own business and IT landscape, is therefore critical to maintaining harmony and keeping things on track.

The truth is that this is something IT should always have been doing, as executive education and awareness in relation to high level IT concepts is a pre-requisite for effective communication and coordination.

But saying it is easier than doing it, especially as hot concepts and ideas are often poorly or inconsistently defined at an industry level. If you are an IT pro reading this, for example, how clear is the meaning of some of the latest industry buzz phrases and acronyms in your own mind? If they are clear to you, how should they be explained to non-technical managers who may need to agree to investments that allow you to take them on board?

These questions and others are explored in the latest Reg Research Study, and we would be really interested in your views and opinions. Please help us by completing the short survey here. ®

The Power of One eBook: Top reasons to choose HP BladeSystem

More from The Register

next story
Apple fanbois SCREAM as update BRICKS their Macbook Airs
Ragegasm spills over as firmware upgrade kills machines
Attack of the clones: Oracle's latest Red Hat Linux lookalike arrives
Oracle's Linux boss says Larry's Linux isn't just for Oracle apps anymore
THUD! WD plonks down SIX TERABYTE 'consumer NAS' fatboy
Now that's a LOT of porn or pirated movies. Or, you know, other consumer stuff
EU's top data cops to meet Google, Microsoft et al over 'right to be forgotten'
Plan to hammer out 'coherent' guidelines. Good luck chaps!
US judge: YES, cops or feds so can slurp an ENTIRE Gmail account
Crooks don't have folders labelled 'drug records', opines NY beak
Manic malware Mayhem spreads through Linux, FreeBSD web servers
And how Google could cripple infection rate in a second
FLAPE – the next BIG THING in storage
Find cold data with flash, transmit it from tape
prev story

Whitepapers

Designing a Defense for Mobile Applications
Learn about the various considerations for defending mobile applications - from the application architecture itself to the myriad testing technologies.
How modern custom applications can spur business growth
Learn how to create, deploy and manage custom applications without consuming or expanding the need for scarce, expensive IT resources.
Reducing security risks from open source software
Follow a few strategies and your organization can gain the full benefits of open source and the cloud without compromising the security of your applications.
Boost IT visibility and business value
How building a great service catalog relieves pressure points and demonstrates the value of IT service management.
Consolidation: the foundation for IT and business transformation
In this whitepaper learn how effective consolidation of IT and business resources can enable multiple, meaningful business benefits.