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Renegade spammer targets junk mail registry

Red mist over Blue Security

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Users of Blue Security's controversial anti-spam system have begun receiving email threats that they'll end up getting even more junk mail unless they opt-out of its network.

Blue has created a "Do Not Intrude Registry" (akin to the Do Not Call Registry for telemarketing) with around 450,000 members. Participants download a small tool, called Blue Frog, which systematically floods the websites of spammers with opt-out messages. Depending on your point of view, this initiative can either be viewed as community action or vigilantism.

Earlier this week, members of the Blue community received aggressive spam messages from an unknown group in an attempt to intimidate users into dropping out of Blue Security's network. Blue Security (somewhat hyperbolically) described the attempted intimidation as "spam terrorism". And, in a nice piece of spin, claims that spammers' reaction to its service validates the firm's approach. It claims six out of 10 spammers comply, or are in the process of complying, with Blue’s Registry.

Even though a portion of members received the belligerent message, Blue Security is keen to play down fears that its email database has fallen into the hands of spammers.

Founder and CEO of Blue Security Eran Reshef said: "Blue Security’s Do Not Intrude Registry is encrypted and individual member emails are not exposed to would-be spammers. The renegade spammer that sent today’s email is using scare tactics and outright lies to further his agenda – to stop the growth of the Blue Community. Our members are not in any jeopardy of 'exposure' as the spammers already have their addresses. That is why they joined the Blue Community – to stop spam at its source by seeking compliance with the registry." ®

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