Feeds

'Smart' phishing attack targets BoI

Next gen spam scams to get even smarter

The essential guide to IT transformation

Bank of Ireland customers have been hit by yet another phishing scam in the form of an email asking users to update their security details.

The fake security alert landed in inboxes on Friday evening, and may have fooled a number of customers into handing over their access codes and passwords, redirecting them to a website designed to collect the details. As of today the fraudulent site appears to have been disabled.

A spokesperson for the bank confirmed it had received several calls from customers about the scam, and that some PINs had been changed.

She described the perpetrators of the attacks as "smart", as it was launched on the Friday of a Bank Holiday weekend. However, the bank did have people available to deal with the issues that arose.

The bank's spokesperson said this was the third attack specifically targeted at its customers in the past 18 months. "They're constant at this stage," she said. "Everyone's experienced them now."

She pointed out that such scams, however, are not evidence of a breach in the bank's security, and that to date it was not aware of fraud being perpetrated on a Bank of Ireland customer as a result of phishing.

"It's a very big net," she explained. "They (the scammers) hope someone will hand over their details."

The bank has warned customers to be wary of such emails, pointing out that it would never request details from a customer in such a way. However, the spokesperson added that awareness of such scams in Ireland appeared to be quite good.

Next generation of spam

It appears that more troubling times are ahead for computer users, with a new generation of spam expected to hit inboxes soon.

Researchers are warning of "smarter spam", which mimics the type and tone of email found in a user's inbox. According to the latest reports, the spam zombies will scan inboxes, gather information and compose convincing replies to existing messages.

This new spam could be more successful at fooling spam filters and other security measures than current incarnations.

Recent developments have also seen spam that tries to gather information over the phone. An email warning users of problems with a bank account and offering a phone number to resolve it have been received by a San Francisco based security firm, Cloudmark.

Copyright © 2006, ENN

Next gen security for virtualised datacentres

More from The Register

next story
Snowden on NSA's MonsterMind TERROR: It may trigger cyberwar
Plus: Syria's internet going down? That was a US cock-up
Who needs hackers? 'Password1' opens a third of all biz doors
GPU-powered pen test yields more bad news about defences and passwords
e-Borders fiasco: Brits stung for £224m after US IT giant sues UK govt
Defeat to Raytheon branded 'catastrophic result'
Microsoft cries UNINSTALL in the wake of Blue Screens of Death™
Cache crash causes contained choloric calamity
Germany 'accidentally' snooped on John Kerry and Hillary Clinton
Dragnet surveillance picks up EVERYTHING, USA, m'kay?
Linux kernel devs made to finger their dongles before contributing code
Two-factor auth enabled for Kernel.org repositories
prev story

Whitepapers

5 things you didn’t know about cloud backup
IT departments are embracing cloud backup, but there’s a lot you need to know before choosing a service provider. Learn all the critical things you need to know.
Implementing global e-invoicing with guaranteed legal certainty
Explaining the role local tax compliance plays in successful supply chain management and e-business and how leading global brands are addressing this.
Build a business case: developing custom apps
Learn how to maximize the value of custom applications by accelerating and simplifying their development.
Rethinking backup and recovery in the modern data center
Combining intelligence, operational analytics, and automation to enable efficient, data-driven IT organizations using the HP ABR approach.
Next gen security for virtualised datacentres
Legacy security solutions are inefficient due to the architectural differences between physical and virtual environments.